For a happier life, give up Facebook, study says

People who go a week without using Facebook feel happier than others, a study says
People who go a week without using Facebook feel happier than others, a study says

Always envious? Got a non-existent social life and struggle to concentrate? All this might be down to Facebook if you believe a study showing those who go a week without using the social network feel happier than others.

Carried out by the Happiness Research Institute, the study involved a sample of 1,095 people in Denmark who were divided into two groups, half of whom continued using Facebook while the others stopped.

"We focused on Facebook because it is the that most people use across ," Meik Wiking, HRI's told AFP Tuesday in Copenhagen, the Danish capital.

After a week, those people who hadn't been on Facebook said they were more satisfied with their lives, with 88 percent of them describing themselves as "happy" compared with 81 percent from the second group.

Some 84 percent said they appreciated their lives compared with 75 percent in the other group, and only 12 percent described themselves as dissatisfied, compared with 20 percent among those who continued using Facebook.

At the end of the experiment, the abstainers reported having a richer social life and fewer difficulties in concentrating, while the others reported no such change.

"Instead of focusing on what we actually need, we have an unfortunate tendency to focus on what other people have," the authors of the study wrote.

In other words, Facebook users are 39 percent more likely to feel less happy than non-users.

Profile of Facebook's operations
Profile of Facebook's operations

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© 2015 AFP

Citation: For a happier life, give up Facebook, study says (2015, November 10) retrieved 24 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-11-happier-life-facebook.html
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Nov 10, 2015
"..."Instead of focusing on what we actually need, we have an unfortunate tendency to focus on what other people have," the authors of the study wrote...." Sounds like our search for alien life. Perhaps, they (aliens) are happier than us. We need an answer???

Nov 11, 2015
Might not this Facebook green with envy sadness also apply to most of what people "follow" on the media period? Remember, for instance, "Material Girl" etc, etc?

Nov 13, 2015
Amen. Worthless spammy crap. Classic American fraud. They actually insist that 90% or some ridiculous number they're making up on the day of FB users know each other in "real life". What a load of BS. Most have never met, the majority of the traffic is between people that have never met, and BTW, you really don't want to. You think after a year or so that there are one or two people that seem OK, would be nice to meet, and then you find out they're total cornflakes and seriously disturbed if you do meet them.

I thought of the idea myself in 1998 and thought it could be a kind of virtual global village. Never did anything with the idea, but look at what Suckerberg saw in it. A source of mass marketing data, adverts and invading peoples' privacy even more. Even the history is bogus. "Some guys in college thought it up". No, Harvard MBAs plotting more nefarious marketing schemes.

Nov 15, 2015
Wow…the non-Facebook users who are commenting, seem SO much happier.

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