EPA bans sale of pesticide that's toxic to honeybees

November 14, 2015 by Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times

It's the end of the line for sulfoxaflor, a pesticide used on a wide variety of produce, but that has been found to be toxic to honeybees that are crucial to pollination of crops.

The federal Environmental Protection Agency prohibited further sales and distribution of the chemical, produced by Dow AgroSciences. Growers who have a stock of the pesticide can still apply it, according to the EPA cancellation order.

The action came in response to a September decision in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that overturned EPA's previous approval of the chemical for use on such as citrus, cotton, canola, strawberries, soybeans and wheat.

Sold under the Closer and Transform, sulfoxaflor is an insecticide aimed at piercing and sucking insects such as aphids and lygus.

Dow AgroSciences said concerns about harm to bees could easily have been addressed by EPA without rescinding permission to use the .

Explore further: Appeals court blocks pesticide use over concerns about bees

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