Africa being left out of climate aid: development bank

Akinwumi Adesina, president of the African Development Bank, said Africa is not getting its fair share of climate funds—which la
Akinwumi Adesina, president of the African Development Bank, said Africa is not getting its fair share of climate funds—which last year stood around $62 billion from governments, multilateral institutions and the private sector

The head of the African Development Bank says the continent is not getting enough of the billions of dollars in climate change funding, despite being the region that suffers most.

With clutch climate talks approaching in December, world leaders are scrambling to come up with pledges toward the target of $100 billion a year by 2020 to fight global warming—a make-or-break promise in the arduous negotiations to reach a comprehensive deal on cutting carbon emissions.

But the development bank's president, Akinwumi Adesina, said the world needs to rethink how it spends that money.

"Africa today contributes just two percent of all , but Africa is the one that suffers most from the impact of ," Adesina told AFP on the sidelines of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank annual meetings in Lima, Peru.

The talks marked the 55-year-old Nigerian's first major world event since taking up his post in September.

"We need to look at how we're dividing up (climate funding) to make sure the financing levels are high enough," said Adesina, a former agriculture minister who was named Forbes magazine's "African of the Year" in 2013.

Africa, he said, is not getting its fair share of climate funds—which last year stood around $62 billion from governments, multilateral institutions and the private sector, according to a recent study.

The problem, he said, is the way climate funding is allocated.

Camels walk past a wind farm in Ethiopia's northern Tigray region
Camels walk past a wind farm in Ethiopia's northern Tigray region

The money, both loans and grants, goes to fund two kinds of projects: mitigation and adaptation.

Mitigation means cutting carbon emissions. Adaptation means preparing for the and natural disasters that will be caused by rising global temperatures.

"What Africa needs is funds for adapting. We have hundred of millions of people who have no way of adapting to climate change," said Adesina.

"But unfortunately, on climate finance, today in the world... 76 percent of financing is dedicated to mitigation.

"This is an imbalance that needs to be addressed."

Smallest polluter, biggest victim

The world's poorest continent is also its lowest polluter, because it has relatively few of the industries, power plants and vehicles that contribute most to .

But most climate funding "tends to favor Asian countries like India and China," said Adesina.

His own institution plans to triple investment in climate-related projects to more than $5 billion a year by 2020, which will represent 40 percent of its total portfolio.

That will put it on par with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development for the title of greenest bank in the world.

French Finance Minister Michel Sapin, whose country will host the upcoming climate talks known as COP21, has called Adesina "very determined" on climate change.

Adesina in turn had a message for Sapin as he races to reach the magic number of $100 billion in funds.

"COP21 needs to be a great success, but in order for it to be a great success it's very important to be able to access the needed financing for both adaptation and mitigation—but first of all adaptation," he said.


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Leaders target $100bn a year in climate funds

© 2015 AFP

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Oct 10, 2015
But unfortunately, on climate finance, today in the world... 76 percent of financing is dedicated to mitigation.


This guy is clueless.

Supposing GHG made by man is the source of warming, it would make more sense to spend the money on projects to lower emissions, which prevents any future damage anyway...year after year.

Western Christian organizations have been making concrete houses and developing irrigation infrastructure for poor people in Africa for decades.

The whole problem with Africa is that western democracies have spoon-fed them for generations, and now they just want more.

The average IQ in sub-saharan Africa is 70, while the average IQ in the U.S. and China is 105.

They have a lot of catching up to do in terms of education, in spite of all the charity work and charity schools, charity hospitals, charity cosmetic surgeries, etc, etc, which western democracies have provided for them too.

Use your own brain for something...for once...

Oct 10, 2015
Flynn Effect

The average rate of increase seems to be about three IQ points per decade in the United States, as scaled by the Wechsler tests. The increasing test performance over time appears on every major test, in every age range, at every ability level, and in every modern industrialized country, although not necessarily at the same rate as in the United States. The increase has been continuous and roughly linear from the earliest days of testing to the present.[7] Though the effect is most associated with IQ increases, a similar effect has been found with increases in attention and of semantic and episodic memory.

using the IQ values of 1997 the average IQ of the United States in 1932, according to the first Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scales standardization sample, was 80.


Perspective: present-day Americans are 25 points ahead of 1932 Americans after 83 years.
We are 35 points ahead of PRESENT DAY Africans, or about 113 years worth of Flynn effect.

Oct 10, 2015
cont...

However, Americans' IQ score is still increasing by about 3 points per decade. Therefore in reality not only are the sub-saharan Africans not catching up in intelligence and education, but instead they are falling farther behind in spite of all our efforts to give them free food and free education and free housing and medicine.

This is the sad truth.

I am not a racist. There are extremely bright people of every race in the world, but most of them live in the U.S., Europe, or China, regardless of their race or national origin.

I think there is something deeply flawed about African culture which totally inhibits their ability to learn and adapt.

I am not a racist, but realistically they are in danger of fulfilling the old racists beliefs from the slavery period...they are literally retarded compared to an average american.

My IQ is double their average...wtf...I'm 233 years ahead of their average...

They are like children in terms of intellectual development.

Oct 10, 2015
Can they even read a thermometer over there? Or do they need a westerner to do that for them too?

Oct 10, 2015
You just keep digging that hole Returners.
It may just return to bite you.
From an African.

njd
Oct 10, 2015
"returners" are you sure you're not inept and feigning to be "smart". . . because for all intents and purposes you're doing a bang of job of that - LMAO

"I am not a racist. There are extremely bright people of every race in the world, but most of them live in the U.S., Europe, or China, regardless of their race or national origin."

Could you please provide your sources for this information? As well as define this word
"race" you keep misusing?

PS. . . the only thing "flawed" about Africa is all those lines in the sand that Rhodes divided up with other thieving colonialists.

Oct 10, 2015
Every time you here "I'm not a racist" expect a racist comment. Returners proved the point.

EWH
Oct 11, 2015
The Flynn Effect is basically due to measurement error rather than a real increase in intelligence. It only applies to non-verbal IQ. Some of the IQ gap between the sub-Saharans and the rest of the world is due to poor nutrition and high parasite burden, but most of it appears to be due to an accumulation of sub-par genes, genetic load. Little to none of the difference is due to education, TV, culture, etc.

The greatest contribution to preventing greenhouse gas emissions that Africa can make is to get their total fertility rates down to the levels of the rest of the world (about 2 per woman) from the present day 6 children per woman average in many African countries. The next greatest contribution they can make is to not start consuming energy at European / American rates (as happens most often when they move to first-world countries). These contributions should be rewarded, but handing out free money to African governments or populations always has had terrible effects.

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