Tiny plankton can play a major role in CO2 storage in the oceans

ocean
Credit: Tiago Fioreze / Wikipedia

Tiny zooplankton animals, each no bigger than a grain of rice, may be playing a huge part in regulating climate change, research involving the University of Strathclyde has found.

The zooplankton group, known as copepods, build up carbon-rich lipids as a nutritional reserve during late summer whilst they are in the of the ocean. Then, they use these reserves to survive their winter hibernation period which they spend at around one mile down in the , out of contact with the atmosphere.

This means that the CO2 released by the hibernating copepods as they use up their lipid reserves does not find its way back into the atmosphere but is instead stored in the depths, where it can remain for thousands of years. The team which undertook the have called this process the 'copepod lipid pump'.

The research showed that one copepod species alone, Calanus finmarchicus, carries between one million and three million tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere into the depths of the North Atlantic Ocean each year.

Professor Michael Heath, of Strathclyde's Department of Mathematics & Statistics, was a partner in the research. He said: "The deep over-wintering of these has been known about for a while but this is the first time that their role in carbon storage has been measured. The results could double the estimates of how much carbon dioxide is being absorbed by the North Atlantic Ocean.

"The role of CO2 in and the urgent need for action to reduce emissions is increasingly well understood. What is particularly important about our results is that the role of the lipid pump, is not taken into account in the existing climate models used by the IPCC. We need to look into this further to find out whether the same thing is happening in other oceans of the world, and how it can be included in the next generation of IPCC models.

"These copepod migrations don't provide a solution to the emissions problem, but our results are certainly part of the process of building up a better understanding of how the planet is responding to increasing CO2 levels".

The research has been published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It was led at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and also involved the University of Copenhagen.


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Copepod migrations are important for the ocean's uptake of CO2

Citation: Tiny plankton can play a major role in CO2 storage in the oceans (2015, September 24) retrieved 21 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-09-tiny-plankton-major-role-co2.html
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Sep 24, 2015
Been going on since The Great Oxygenation Event. It's where our oil comes from.

Sep 24, 2015
It is as if we put Humanity in a closed location and let the Carbon Dioxide build up until it starts to become toxic to us. As the copepods put the CO2 into the seas, it increases the acidity, and now threatens their existence. They are having a hard time making carbonate shells.

If we kill the copepods at the bottom of the food chain, we are gone, too.

Sep 24, 2015
Ah, a one rating.

Some folk do not care if we kill the Earth and ourselves, apparently.

Sep 24, 2015
But we do care about liars and fabricators posting on this site. Better to assume your posts are all crap and 1/5 you, than going to the trouble of checking them all.

Youre not the champion of these causes that you think you are.

Sep 24, 2015
It is as if we put Humanity in a closed location and let the Carbon Dioxide build up until it starts to become toxic to us. As the copepods put the CO2 into the seas, it increases the acidity, and now threatens their existence. They are having a hard time making carbonate shells.

If we kill the copepods at the bottom of the food chain, we are gone, too.

That is absolute nonsense.

This article shows:

1. That the Earth has long had countless self-regulating components.
2. The constant discovery of new things shows that our knowledge of climate science is in its infancy; socio-economic policies based on incomplete science is one of the greatest dangers facing human prosperity *ever*.

Regarding Ocean Acidification, PH goes up, PH goes down. It is a symptom of a living planet. Observe, history of oceanic acidities. Notice the flux:
http://www.skepti...vels.gif

Sep 24, 2015
I suggest the skeptics look up the fate of the copepods and think what means to the rest of the Earth.

Sep 24, 2015
I suggest the skeptics look up the fate of the copepods and think what means to the rest of the Earth.
Why dont you provide links and excerpts to support what you say like everybody else? I know-

It means you are lazy or inconsiderate or you have the attention span of a drugged-up gnat or youre just making shit up as usual, which is most likely the case.

You see why people here want you gone?

Sep 24, 2015
see http://www.sott.n...s-a-scam

"Top US scientist Hal Lewis resigned this week from his post at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He admitted global warming climate change was nothing but a scam in his resignation letter. "

Sep 24, 2015
Yeah, . . all those temperature readings, all that hot weather, all those all-time (for us) heat records, . . . all fabricated to scare the goobers out of their money so we can do, . . what?

Sep 25, 2015
all those temperature readings

Going down:
http://woodfortre.../to:2015

all those all-time (for us) heat records

Not even close:
http://c3headline...0d-400wi

all fabricated

One hopes not, but the inconsistencies are cause for concern.


Sep 25, 2015
Going down:
http://woodfortre
Not:
http://woodfortrees.org/plot/rss/from:1985/to:2015/trend/plot/rss/from:1985/to:2015" title="http://http://woodfortrees.org/plot/rss/from:1985/to:2015/trend/plot/rss/from:1985/to:2015" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://woodfortre.../to:2015

your Cherrypicked graph?
Trends are typically 30 yrs (& adjusted above). You were given that link in your discussion with furlong, where you were also taught about cherrypicking, etc
apparently you learned only that you like repeating lies (doen't make it true)

You should also read the site warnings
"Beware sharp tools"
However, with sharp tools comes great responsibility... Please read the notes on things to beware of - and in particular on the problems with short, cherry-picked trends. Remember that the signals we are dealing with are very, very noisy, and it's easy to get misled - or worse, still to mislead others
http://woodfortrees.org/

You should also remember equipment does age and get affected by exposure: see also Karl et al, as well as Peterson et al, both of which you've linked in the past but somehow failed to re

Sep 25, 2015
Going down:
http://woodfortre.../to:2015
Because the above link is not working right, I have re-posted it here:

http://woodfortre.../to:2015

trends are typically 30 years for a reason, and that was explained to you [dung] by furlong et al in the other thread where you started promoting this lie with your political argument sans scientific evidence

repeating a political lie without empirical evidence or validated studies is obfuscation of science (and worse)

still not true, dung

Sep 25, 2015
Speaking of fabrication:
Overall, from 1880 to the present, approximately 66% of the temperature data in the adjusted GHCN temperature data consists of estimated values produced by adjustment models, while 34% of the data are raw values retained from direct measurements. The rural split is 60% estimated, 40% retained. The non-rural split is 68% estimated, 32% retained. Total non-rural measurements outpace rural measurements by a factor of 3x.

Approximately 7% of the raw data is discarded. If this data were included as-is in the final record it would likely introduce a warming component from 1880 to 1950, followed by a cooling component from 1951 to the present.

http://www.ncdc.n...tml#QUAL


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