British Egyptologist on quest to find Nefertiti's tomb

September 21, 2015
Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves thinks Queen Nefertiti's tomb may be a secret chamber joined to that of her son in the Valley of th
Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves thinks Queen Nefertiti's tomb may be a secret chamber joined to that of her son in the Valley of the Kings at Luxor in southern Egypt

A British archaeologist who believes the legendary Queen Nefertiti may be buried in a secret room adjoining her son Tutankhamun's tomb is coming to Egypt to test his theory, authorities said Monday.

Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves will arrive in the country at the end of the month, a statement said.

To this day, Nefertiti's final resting place remains a mystery.

Renowned as one of history's great beauties, Nefertiti was the powerful wife of Pharaoh Akhenaton, remembered for having converted his kingdom to monotheism with the worship of one sun god, Aton.

His queen played an important political and religious role in ancient Egypt in the 14th century BC.

Reeves thinks her tomb may be a secret chamber joined to that of her son in the Valley of the Kings at Luxor in southern Egypt.

He will arrive on September 28 to outline his theory and join Antiquities Minister Mamduh al-Damati and "the best Egyptologists in the ministry to examine the interior of the tomb", Monday's statement said.

In a study published this year, the Egyptologist at the American University of Arizona said murals in Tutankhamun's funerary chamber could conceal the existence of two doors.

Reeves wrote that high-resolution scans of the walls "reveal, beneath the plastered surfaces of the painted scenes, distinct linear traces".

He said these are "tentatively identified as the 'ghosts' of two hitherto unrecognised doorways".

The sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun, known as the 'Child Pharaoh' in its burial chamber on November 4, 2007 in the Valley of the
The sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun, known as the 'Child Pharaoh' in its burial chamber on November 4, 2007 in the Valley of the Kings

Unexplored chamber?

Behind one such doorway could be "a still unexplored storage chamber" from Tutankhamun's burial.

But behind the other could be "the undisturbed burial of the tomb's original owner—Nefertiti".

Tutankhamun—the Boy King—died at the age of just 19 in 1324 BC after ruling for nine years.

His tomb was discovered in 1922 by British archaeologist Howard Carter.

Reeves believes that Tutankhamun's premature death meant his own tomb had not yet been built, so it was decided to reopen Nefertiti's tomb 10 years after her death so he could be buried there too.

A news conference has been scheduled for October 1 in Cairo to present preliminary findings and an action plan to "verify with certainty" if hidden rooms exist and "still conceal secrets or not", the statement said.

Ministry officials said that after the preliminary examination, a second study of the tomb wall may be made using special equipment brought in from Japan.

On September 20, the antiquities ministry announced that Tutankhamun's tomb would be closed from October for restoration.

It was not clear how long the restoration work, which includes giving the tomb a new floor, would last.

Luxor, a city of half a million on the banks of the river Nile, is an open-air museum abounding with temples and from ancient Egypt.

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6 comments

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TheGhostofOtto1923
5 / 5 (2) Sep 21, 2015
This is all well and good but if we want to find answers to history then we need to open the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor.
betterexists
1 / 5 (2) Sep 21, 2015
So, they were wearing clothes in 14th century BC.
May not be suitable for Ice & Snow, Yes!
Only mistake Native Americans did was not invent a gun earlier.
24volts
5 / 5 (4) Sep 21, 2015
@betterexist It wouldn't have made much if any difference at all in the final outcome. Most of the native Americans were killed off by diseases that they had no immunities that were brought over by the first explorers . By the time the people got here that wanted to start colonies it was pretty much already over for the original population. The few that were left would have been overwhelmed just like they were guns or no guns.
scuzzmonster
4.5 / 5 (2) Sep 22, 2015
Out of curiosity, how come it wasn't the first explorers who succumbed to disease rather than the indigenous population? Seems more logical somehow.
TheGhostofOtto1923
5 / 5 (2) Sep 22, 2015
Out of curiosity, how come it wasn't the first explorers who succumbed to disease rather than the indigenous population? Seems more logical somehow.
The diseases they brought arose from their close association with farm animals. Amerinds had no such evolutionary history.

Yellow fever supposedly came from amerinds.
Nik_2213
not rated yet Sep 26, 2015
"...how come it wasn't the first explorers who succumbed to disease"

Some did, IIRC, but more kept coming....

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