New material science research may advance tech tools

New material science research may advance tech tools
LSU researchers created holes, or antidots, in thin films of manganite, which is used to build magnetic hard discs in computers. It was discovered that the edges of the antidots were magnetic. Credit: Ward Plummer, Louisiana State University

Hard, complex materials with many components are used to fabricate some of today's most advanced technology tools. However, little is still known about how the properties of these materials change under specific temperatures, magnetic fields and pressures.

Researchers from LSU, Fudan University, the University of Florida and the Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures in Nanjing, China, conducted research on materials that separate into different regions through a process called electronic phase separation, which is poorly understood. Their research advances the understanding of how these materials can be manipulated without having to discover new materials, change the chemical concentration or apply .

Their research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The researchers manipulated a steel gray mineral called manganite, which is used to build magnetic hard discs in computers. They created holes, or antidots, in thin films of manganite. It was discovered that the edges of the antidots were magnetic.

"The discovery of the magnetic edge states on the antidots made this work possible. Nobody had ever seen this before," said LSU Physics Professor Ward Plummer, a co-author on the study.

The magnetic phase state at the edges of the antidots raised the metal-to-insulator phase transition temperature of the manganite film. The researchers were able to replicate this through simulations.

"People have really tried to increase the temperature and reduce the operating field or tried to change the substrate or chemical composition. But we find this new approach with antidots to be quite useful," said Jian Shen, head of the Department of Physics at Fudan University and a co-author on the paper.

"What you really would like to do is get this temperature above , so you can switch the material by using a ," Plummer said.


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More information: Manipulating electronic phase separation in strongly correlated oxides with an ordered array of antidots, Kai Zhang,  9558–9562, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1512326112
Citation: New material science research may advance tech tools (2015, August 31) retrieved 21 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-material-science-advance-tech-tools.html
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Aug 31, 2015
Try a 4D unit-less space, I map the axis unit onto lambda, this gives me a length-time conversion which allows every point of this space to be defined relative to any point you choose. The field will be totally defined with simple addition. Define a single ply for a "-" and for "+". Ignore the symmetry, for now. You'll hypnotize yourself. Simply add each ply defined with attributes at each point. Simple. I get 1% for anyone that profits from this idea, or at least a formal thank-you. Vo! Thanks, Maxwell, nice collection. Love your empiricism. Too bad you didn't throw away mass.

Aug 31, 2015
Each point: |R| * Unit_Directional_4D Vector? Within the field? Not upon a particle, or simply the direction from point to point, i.e. every-thing has a reference. How about relative to the center of the +'s or the center of the -'s. How about relative to any collective center, ... Scale!

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