Towards the ultimate model of water

May 8, 2015, National Physical Laboratory
Characteristic hexagonal-ring structure of proton-ordered ice II. Credit: NPL / University of Edinburgh

Researchers from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), IBM and the University of Edinburgh have developed the first conceptually simple but broadly applicable model for water.

Water is essential to life as we know it; from its unusual density maximum which preserves by ensuring that ponds freeze from the top down during winter, to its which shape proteins and the DNA double helix.

But while (in its liquid, solid and vapour forms) is one of the most common substances on Earth, many of its life-sustaining properties remain a mystery. Understanding how a molecule of such apparent simplicity can encode for complex and unusual behaviour across a wide range of pressures and temperatures has been an enduring challenge for scientists.

An international collaboration involving NPL, IBM and Edinburgh University has produced a new strategy for describing matter at the atomic scale based on a simplified representation of electronic and quantum mechanical effects.

Reporting in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team showed that their 'Quantum Drude Model' captures the full range of electronic responses of  and that these are essential for a complete prediction of water's signature properties, covering liquid-gas phase equilibria from freezing to the critical point. These results establish the first conceptually simple, intuitive but broadly applicable model for water.

The method's success describing a challenging system such as water means it could be applied more generally to tackle new problems in materials science and provide insights into the molecular origin of complexity across the physical and life sciences.

Earlier this year, the researchers used their model to reveal the molecular structure of water's liquid surface in research published in the journal Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.

Explore further: Quantum model helps solve mysteries of water

More information: "Signature properties of water: Their molecular electronic origins." PNAS 2015 ; published ahead of print May 4, 2015, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1418982112

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cantdrive85
1 / 5 (7) May 08, 2015
But while water (in its liquid, solid and vapour forms) is one of the most common substances on Earth, many of its life-sustaining properties remain a mystery. Understanding how a molecule of such apparent simplicity can encode for complex and unusual behaviour across a wide range of pressures and temperatures has been an enduring challenge for scientists.


This is because scientists fail to acknowledge that water has a fourth phase, and likely where the "magic" happens...

http://faculty.wa...ew-book/
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (5) May 08, 2015
Interesting that a Professor is allowed to use a University web site to hawk a book or two....
I Have Questions
5 / 5 (3) May 09, 2015
But while water (in its liquid, solid and vapour forms) is one of the most common substances on Earth, many of its life-sustaining properties remain a mystery. Understanding how a molecule of such apparent simplicity can encode for complex and unusual behaviour across a wide range of pressures and temperatures has been an enduring challenge for scientists.


This is because scientists fail to acknowledge that water has a fourth phase, and likely where the "magic" happens...

http://faculty.wa...ew-book/


What is the fourth phase of water?
viko_mx
1 / 5 (4) May 09, 2015
The trinity principle. Water can be in tree states on Earth. Vapor, liquid or ice.
The same apply to the strong conected quarks - the building particals of proton an neutrons.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (5) May 09, 2015
This is because scientists fail to acknowledge that water has a fourth phase, and likely where the "magic" happens...

http://faculty.wa...ew-book/

And... if they fail to acknowledge it, why is it "a Scientist" and his posse are the ones presenting it in a book available from a University website?
katesisco
1 / 5 (1) May 09, 2015
I dont understand it but Miles Mathis has reviewed the fourth phase of water in his postings. Is maybe water is our Earth's version of dark matter? Since science recognizes that we are unbalanced as to having too much matter over antimatter?
cantdrive85
1 / 5 (2) May 09, 2015
What is the fourth phase of water?


EZ water.

https://www.youtu...7tCMUDXU
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (1) May 09, 2015
What is the fourth phase of water?


EZ water.

https://www.youtu...7tCMUDXU

Well, I do have to say, getting a "TED" talk is fairly convincing display of credentials...
docile
May 09, 2015
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Mike_Massen
3.7 / 5 (3) May 10, 2015
viko_mx claims
The trinity principle. Water can be in tree states on Earth. Vapor, liquid or ice
Really, why stop there, did your creator you keep talking about stop there ?

Water has two other 'states' if you can call them that:-

1. Bose Einstein condensate
2. Plasma & this is a very special one as Water can reform & disassociate in a dynamic with a stable state falling into molecular water but still allows an H2O as a molecule to lose or gain an electron in the border line plasma state with a certain persistence period, ie Not simple as viko_mx would like to assume.

ie. The self assembly patterns in the universe from the beginning allow states beyond the complexities of those simple rules - eg snow-flakes, the immense number of permutations ALL come from simple water naturally a& easily ALL the time !

viko_mx claims
The same apply to the strong conected quarks - the building particals of proton an neutrons
Really, show the 5 states, more than 3 ?
Mike_Massen
3 / 5 (2) May 13, 2015
I forgot to add there is yet another very useful state of water which occurs at higher temp & higher pressure, it effectively is an amazing blend of liquid & gaseous states called supercriticality & can be applied to other gases/liquids as well such as CO2.

Super critical water however, can be used as a combustion medium for destroying; harmful organic compounds, waste pharmaceuticals & a whole host of biological materials such as deadly bacteria & even prions. Has been used by big drug companies for years to process waste organics to produce just CO2 & water but, the process is slow for producing high energy density like an engine...

More info here on super critical water & with CO2:-
https://en.wikipe...al_fluid

The problem with viko_mx is he tries to find world examples to match his naive religious emotional attachment from a book which seems to be the very best way all deities communicate ie Just like lazy casual humans focusing on power !
Mike_Massen
3 / 5 (2) May 14, 2015
docile offered
...in essence it's a soft phase analogy of cold fusion.
Can you explain what this means please esp 'soft phase' and how you imagine it applies to any analogy of cold fusion process either anticipated from current work or as some catalyst etc - trying to read through your phraseology, so an expansion especially in relation to Science ie Physics would be immensely helpful ?
Mike_Massen
2 / 5 (1) May 14, 2015
cantdrive85 with derision claims
This is because scientists fail to acknowledge that water has a fourth phase, and likely where the "magic" happens.
http://faculty.wa...new-book
What is meant by "fail to acknowledge" ?

Your claim is like many re "Electric Universe" (EU), ie scientists "fail to acknowledge"

cantdrive85, how do you imagine the scientific community functions, do you imagine Eg that all scientists should automatically know each detail of all contrary theories whether proven or not eg EU

EZ property re youtube link is an advance, shows science methodology at work, re observations, hypothesis, demonstration etc but, to deride [all] scientists for not knowing about it suggests you have some chip on your shoulder re scientists who have studied and followed an interest to develop understanding within a field. EZ has evidence.

If deriding due primarily to EU, there's negligible evidence but, don't deride scientists as a group Eg EZ !

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