How harmful male genitalia can impact reproduction in other species

How harmful male genitalia can impact reproduction in other species
C. chinensis male trying to mate with a C. maculatus female. Credit: Kyogoku, D. and Sota, T.

Male Callosobruchus chinensis seed beetles have spines on their genitalia, which increase their fertilization success but injure a female's reproductive tract—especially a female of a related species called Callosobruchus maculatus.

New research indicates that such harmful male genitalia can diminish the reproductive success of competing species and may play an important role in interspecies competition, with considerable demographic and .

"Harmful male genitalia and consequent fitness loss in heterospecific females may be one of the mechanisms by which closely related species pairs are often prevented from local coexistence," said Dr. Daisuke Kyogok, lead author of the Journal of Evolutionary Biology study.


Explore further

Male competition over females: An evolutionary engine of genital evolution

More information: Kyogoku, D. and Sota, T. (2015), Exaggerated male genitalia intensify interspecific reproductive interference by damaging heterospecific female genitalia. Journal of Evolutionary Biology. DOI: 10.1111/jeb.12646
Journal information: Journal of Evolutionary Biology

Provided by Wiley
Citation: How harmful male genitalia can impact reproduction in other species (2015, May 19) retrieved 5 December 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-05-male-genitalia-impact-reproduction-species.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
101 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments