Cablevision CEO wants New York cable deal

May 6, 2015 byTali Arbel

The CEO of Cablevision said he wants deals with New York cable operators.

Cablevision Systems Corp. is focused in the greater New York City area and has 3.1 million customers. New York is also a big market for the country's second-biggest cable company, Time Warner Cable Inc.

Cablevision CEO James Dolan was speaking on a stage Wednesday with CEOs of most of the country's biggest cable companies, excepting Comcast, at an event at an industry trade show in Chicago. Comcast Corp.'s CEO spoke on Tuesday.

Comcast's $45 billion bid for Time Warner Cable recently fell apart because of regulators' concerns about the combined company's power over the Internet and the growing online video industry.

But industry consolidation is expected to continue, with many predicting that Charter Communications Inc. will try to buy Time Warner Cable.

The CEO of Time Warner Cable, Rob Marcus, said Wednesday that he was focused on Time Warner Cable and had no further comment.

When asked about potential acquisitions, Charter CEO Thomas Rutledge said, "The world is full of possibilities but I can't tell you any of them."

The Comcast-Time Warner Cable deal would have created a national behemoth with about 30 percent of the country's video subscribers and more than half of its high-speed broadband customers.

But Dolan said consolidation of local marketplaces would also benefit cable companies. It "would provide a great deal of ingenuity and access to much more resources for customers and lower prices," he said.

"If New York was operated like one market, you would see things like Wi-Fi distributed throughout the entire marketplace," Dolan added.

Even if they share a region, do not typically compete with each other for the same homes.

Verizon's FiOS service does compete directly with the and is available in New York City. When asked if he was interested in a deal with FiOS, Dolan said no.

Explore further: Comcast abandons Time Warner Cable bid after gov't pushback

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RichTheEngineer
not rated yet May 06, 2015
"But [Cablevision CEO] Dolan said consolidation of local marketplaces would also benefit cable companies. It 'would provide a great deal of ingenuity and access to much more resources for customers and lower prices,' he said. 'If New York was operated like one market, you would see things like Wi-Fi distributed throughout the entire marketplace,' Dolan added.

Crap. Consolidation would only benefit cable companies. It will squash innovation and actually reduce resources for customers and it would significantly raise prices. If New York was one market, you would see a rape of consumer unmatched in modern times.

Do these CEOs actually think they can bullshit us? It has been proven time and time again in cable industry that elimination of competition always screws consumer while only benefitting cable companies and gov't bureaucrats they lobby.

Go sit in a corner and play with yourself, Dolan, it's the most useful activity you can do.

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