Google unveils 'stick' computer with Asus

Chromebit
Google and Taiwan's Asus are launching a "computer on a stick" which can plug into a display to turn it into a PC.

Google said in a blog post that the Asus Chromebit would be arriving mid-year with a low price tag.

"Smaller than a , the Chromebit is a full computer that will be available for less than $100," Google said.

"By simply plugging this device into any , you can turn it into a computer. It's the perfect upgrade for an existing desktop and will be really useful for schools and businesses."

The statement offered no other details on the device, but Google also announced its lowest-cost Chromebook laptop computers at $149 in partnership with Chinese electronic groups Haier and Hisense.

With a display of 11.6 inches, the Haier computer is being sold through Amazon and the Hisense PC through Walmart.

Google has produced Chrome devices with other manufacturers including Acer, Lenovo, Dell and LG.


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© 2015 AFP

Citation: Google unveils 'stick' computer with Asus (2015, March 31) retrieved 18 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-google-unveils-asus.html
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User comments

Mar 31, 2015
If this gadget is HDMI with HDCP, they can keep it. I was given a ChromeCast for Xmas a year ago which is HDMI with HDCP. My component only HiDef TV could not use it. No HDMI, no HDCP. I did get an HDMI to HiDef component converter, but found out it is illegal to have a HDCP stripper.

HDCP is a proprietary encryption Intel Corp. scheme glommed onto by SONY, etc., so, no company selling a HDCP stripper lasts very long. (Legal Proceedings by "The Digital Rights Gang" start very quickly).

I may be interested if they go w/o the HDCP.

BTW, why would Google use HDCP to protect digital rights of all YouTube videos? I would guess they could switch it on and off when selling "Pay for View" content.

Mar 31, 2015
If this gadget is HDMI with HDCP, they can keep it. I was given a ChromeCast for Xmas a year ago which is HDMI with HDCP. My component only HiDef TV could not use it.

What bargain basement made-in-Kazakastan HDTV did you manage to get without an HDMI port on it? They *all* have HDMI ports, unless it isn't full HD.

That isn't Google's fault, that's yours for not buying a TV that follows accepted standards.

Mar 31, 2015
I have to agree with gopher. I haven't seen a TV in at least 8 years sold in North America without at least 2 HDMI ports on it.

I even have a "Viewsonic" 40" TV without a tuner from 2006 with an HDMI port on it.

I bought a TV for a gift last Christmas. 36" wide, 3 HDMI ports, tuner, VGA input, optical audio output, all for $200. You really must have scraped the used TV market to find one without.

Mar 31, 2015
Where does the stick get power from? HDMI on a TV is power sink? Is HDMI power from a source enough to power anything much? Requires MHL?

Mar 31, 2015
It requires a USB port. All this chit chat about HDMI confused me.

Apr 01, 2015
Hmmm there is also the issue - tiny head, tiny gut = tiny brain. Or not much processor, using very little power = not much number crunching capacity.

It's running an OS that is almost exclusively geared towards internet based applications. So all it actually needs to run (well) is a browser.

You're certainly not going to run simulations or high end games on this.

Apr 01, 2015
Begs the question of what sort of display they mean....

HD TV with USB port ? Perhaps, but there a lot of semi-smart TVs out there that are very fussy about file formats etc.

And, d'uh, where's the Cat-5 port, guys ? I had to hard-wire our BluRay box and Roku widget because they couldn't hang onto a big-name WAP that was mere feet away, never mind the network base-station on my desk upstairs...

Apr 02, 2015
Time to respond to:
Gopher65, Lord_Jag
Bought top of the line HD TV 1080i 720p in 2002. Home theatre sized. Runs great. Hard to move. Only paid $2200 at the time. I see them on the street now waiting pick up. Living on SS now, so unless you want to buy me a replacement, be more considerate.

I did not notice anyone minding that HDCP is a freedom destroying technology. Probably too complex for simple minds.

Apr 02, 2015
My simple mind says it's unethical, and in an increasing number of jurisdictions unlawful, to infringe copyright. So HDCP strippers being illegal should not be a deal breaker for you. What 'freedom' is HDCP destroying for you?

Apr 05, 2015
Seems like the advent of 'burner' computers. I wonder if cyber criminals will find a special use for these, much like street criminals would use disposable cell phones. Upload a worm onto it, plug it into an innocuous port at a supermarket, walk away and slowly infect all the wifi enabled gadgets in the store. For just $90 at a local kiosk, and minimal risk to the criminal.

Apr 07, 2015
My simple mind says it's unethical, and in an increasing number of jurisdictions unlawful, to infringe copyright. So HDCP strippers being illegal should not be a deal breaker for you. What 'freedom' is HDCP destroying for you?


Freedom of information and fair use as afforded by the copyright law. You can't for example make a copy of a bluray disc you bought so the kids don't scratch the original, because it's encrypted.

HDCP is also designed to brick devices you own. Every disc with HDCP content contains a black list of vendors the movie industry doesn't like, and sticking such a disc inside a device containing a legal HDCP decryption chip will make it stop working. Example:

http://hacks.esar...y-drive/

Apr 07, 2015
http://en.wikiped...otection

"the main practical effect of HDCP has been to create one more way in which your electronics could fail to work properly with your TV," and concluded in the aftermath of the master key fiasco that HDCP has been "less a security system than a tool for shaping the consumer electronics market."[27]

Additional issues arise when interactive media (i.e. video games) suffer from control latency due to the additional processing (encoding/decoding) required. Various everyday usage situation, such as live streaming or capture of game play, are also adversely affected.



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