Juggling too many remotes? Try this touch screen

February 18, 2015 byMichael Liedtke
This product image provided by Ray Enterprises shows the Ray Super Remote. The $199 device is designed to control TVs, cable boxes, DVRs, video game consoles and Internet streaming players such as Roku and Apple TV. What's more, the device runs on software that learns viewers' preferences so it can list programs suited to their interests. (AP Photo/Ray Enterprises)

How many remotes does it take to watch television, stream Netflix or record your favorite show on DVR?

The Ray Super Remote wants to declutter your and become the of all of your . The touch-screen device, released Tuesday, is designed to control TVs, cable boxes, DVRs, video game consoles and Internet streaming players such as Roku and Apple TV. What's more, it runs on software that learns viewers' preferences so it can list programs suited to personal interests.

"As we looked at ways to reimagine TV, it seemed like the needed the most help," says David Skokna, CEO of New York-based Ray Enterprises. "We think we have a big opportunity to do something magical."

Priced at $199, the remote won't be released until May or June, but pre-orders are being accepted online at www.ray.co . It requires a Wi-Fi system and pay-TV boxes to work properly.

This isn't the first attempt to build a smarter remote control. Logitech and a few other electronics companies have been making universal remote controls for years. More recently, a variety of mobile apps have been offering ways to turn smartphones and tablets into multipurpose remote controls.

After nearly three years developing his device, Skokna is counting on the Ray remote's versatility and intelligence to stand out from the other options on the market.

The Ray remote controls more than 200,000 devices and can run applications that will enable it to control other Internet-connected home appliances, such as Google's Nest thermostat. The search and recommendation features are set up to eliminate the need to spend a lot of time looking for content. Users can tell the remote what kinds of programming interests them, such as soccer or comedy, so shows fitting those categories are automatically highlighted on the nearly 5-inch screen.

The remote's battery lasts for about 10 days, and can be easily recharged in a power station that doubles as a holding tray.

The biggest question facing the Ray remote may be this: How many people are so frustrated with juggling multiple controls that they will be willing to spend $199 on another device?

Explore further: New Samsung remote control features TV screen

Related Stories

There's more than one way to connect

May 28, 2013

It's not enough these days to wonder what to watch on your TV; a growing question for many is how to watch. Just like any device in your life, TVs can now connect to the Internet. This lets you grab shows from the Internet ...

Apple watcher spots room for HomeKit in Apple TV beta

October 9, 2014

At the core of the connected home decked out with smart devices could be none other than the Apple TV, with the company's latest beta software bringing HomeKit support to its $99 streaming set-top box, reported Neil Hughes, ...

Jumping into streaming TV

September 1, 2014

More TV viewers are picking up so-called streaming media boxes in the hope of fulfilling a simple wish: Let me watch what I want when I want.

Recommended for you

Paleontologists report world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex

March 22, 2019

University of Alberta paleontologists have just reported the world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex and the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Canada. The 13-metre-long T. rex, nicknamed "Scotty," lived in prehistoric Saskatchewan ...

NASA instruments image fireball over Bering Sea

March 22, 2019

On Dec. 18, 2018, a large "fireball—the term used for exceptionally bright meteors that are visible over a wide area—exploded about 16 miles (26 kilometers) above the Bering Sea. The explosion unleashed an estimated 173 ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

alfie_null
not rated yet Feb 18, 2015
More info on how programs are categorized would be helpful. 'Comedy', mentioned, is a broad category. If I like Monty Python's Flying Circus, am I also likely to enjoy some sewer-mouthed stand-up comedian? Attempting a more narrow category, like sitcoms, still doesn't work. If I like Big Bang Theory, will I like reruns of Three's Company? Even within a single series, it doesn't work well - if I liked first year Happy Days, will I like post jump-the-shark Happy Days?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.