Research finds clue to why females live longer than males

Drosophila
Drosophila. Credit: Wikipedia

A study from the University of Exeter has found that male flies die earlier than their female counterparts when forced to evolve with the pressures of mate competition and juvenile survival. The results could help researchers understand the mechanisms involved in ageing.

The research, published in the journal Functional Ecology, used populations of the fly Drosophila simulans that had evolved under different selection regimes. The study shows that mate competition (sexual selection), along with survival (natural selection), is tougher on male ageing than it is on females reducing their lifespan by about a third.

Some species, like the flies in this study, age quickly over a number of days while others - including some trees and whales - age slowly across centuries.

Professor David Hosken from Biosciences at the University of Exeter said: "We found dramatic differences in the effects of sexual and natural selection on male and female flies. These results could help explain the sex differences in lifespan seen in many species, including humans, and the diverse patterns of ageing we observe in nature."

The flies were subjected to elevated or relaxed sexual and natural selection and left to evolve in these conditions. To elevate sexual selection groups of males were housed with single females. A stressful temperature was used to elevate natural selection.

Males court females by singing, dancing and smelling good but their efforts come at considerable cost and this cost is amplified when they also have to cope with stressful temperatures.

The results of the study showed that under relaxed sexual and natural selection, male and female had very similar lifespans - around 35 days. However males that evolved under elevated sexual selection and elevated natural selection had a much shorter lifespan - just 24 days - and died seven days earlier than females under the same conditions.

Both and were found to affect lifespan but their effects were greatest on males. The findings show that the sexes can respond differently to the same selection regimes.


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Journal information: Functional Ecology

Citation: Research finds clue to why females live longer than males (2014, December 1) retrieved 16 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-clue-females-longer-males.html
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Dec 02, 2014
Or maybe men just get nagged to death!

Dec 02, 2014
Once the female flies realized they were being objectified by the males, they felt validated and liberated from the yoke of patriarchy. The males brooded over the loss of love unrequited while females learned assertiveness and how happiness doesn't include males

Dec 17, 2014
See another article on Phys.org referencing men's risk taking proclivities...

Dec 17, 2014
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