More toxicity in canola-based biodiesel

More toxicity in canola-based biodiesel
"They also have a higher specific surface area and thus higher capacity to absorb toxic compounds, and are able to penetrate into the respiratory system, to be retained in the lungs and penetrate into the cardiovascular system," he says. Credit: Jenn Durfey

Exhaust from pure canola oil biodiesel is more lethal for human epithelial cells than that from traditional diesel, new research contends.

Epithelial cells, which are found in the lining of the airways and lungs, provide the body's first line of defence against viruses and capable of invading the body.

The research found that the ultrafine size of fuel exhaust particles from refined and blended could lead to respiratory health problems.

The researchers examined how react to diluted exhaust from four fuels: standard pump-diesel (ULSD), unprocessed canola oil, 100 per cent canola biodiesel (B100) and a 20/80 per cent blend of canola oil and ULSD (B20).

"Different fuel types, combusted under identical conditions, produced significantly different amounts of important exhaust gases and different particle characteristics," Telethon Kids Institute Associate Professor Alexander Larcombe says.

"Pure canola oil exhaust contained significantly more carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) than the others and the lowest amount of nitric oxide (NO).

"[Epithelial] cells exposed to pure canola oil exhaust were significantly less viable than cells exposed to any other exhaust 24 hours after exposure."

The particle's physical characteristics, such as distribution size, had an impact while the cell's viability was negatively correlated with CO and strongly correlated with NO.

The study raises a red flag on particle concentrations at the far ends of the size spectrum.

Of the tested fuels, B100 and B20 contained the greatest number of very small particles.

Given that inhalation-related health problems are strongly associated with ultrafine particles, this could be problematic.

"The smaller particles produced from B20 and B100 combustion are likely to remain suspended in the atmosphere for longer and are therefore more likely to be inhaled," A/Prof Larcombe says.

"They also have a higher specific surface area and thus higher capacity to absorb toxic compounds, and are able to penetrate into the respiratory system, to be retained in the lungs and penetrate into the cardiovascular system."

Also, once inside the body, smaller particles induce a greater inflammatory effect and are less likely to be removed by natural processes.

A 2010 analysis of 700 peer-reviewed studies found causal relationships, though not proof, between exhaust pollution and impaired lung and heart function, including hardening of the arteries.


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Nov 04, 2014
More toxicity in canola-based biodiesel


Canola? That's organic or something right?

Nov 04, 2014
Interesting quote: "Pure canola oil exhaust contained significantly more carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) than the others". Apparently some of the "Green" fuels that are expected to help replace traditional carbon fuels can actually be worse for the environment and humanity than the fuels they are designed to help replace. Obviously more testing is needed of these newer fuels so we can have a better understanding of the risks.

Nov 04, 2014
Isn't Canadian rapeseed a genetically modified organism?

Nov 04, 2014
Somebody tell mister gun the difference between "organic" and Genetically- modified.

Nov 05, 2014
Not surprised. Not sure why anybody thought biodiesel was better, it's just cheaper if you make it yourself. We have 2 BMW clean diesel cars that produce no smoke, no soot, no smell. After reacting the exhaust with urea the majority of the exhaust becomes nitrogen and water vapor. These engines run very lean and therefore produce minimal amounts of unburned particle. Unburned particle is trapped in a filter and re-burned. You can't burn anything but ULSD in these engines because anything else, including biodiesel, produces way too much unburned particle. Modern diesel fuels are very refined, clean and efficient fuels. And by the way, one of those cars produces more torque than a Corvette, goes to 60 in about 5.5 seconds and will get upwards 40mpg on the highway.

Nov 08, 2014
Rape seed oil causes cancer. Canola is hybridized to reduce carcinogens to USDA acceptable levels. It still causes cancer, but at levels deemed acceptable by US corporations to for ignorant and highly distracted consumers

It would appear that refining intensifies the toxicity of rape seed oil

KBK
Nov 09, 2014
Using an axillary alternator powered 'brown's gas' generator, and using the low levels of browns gas produced as a mix with the air intake on the given gasoline vehicle (diesel or gasoline), so it mixes with the biodiesel....this can ~~~and does~~ reduce particle count to virtually ~ZERO~. (99% reduction in all effluent)

The energy used by the brown's gas generator is off set by the increased efficiency of the given ICE, by an extra 10%, over and above the energy used. A net ~10% efficiency increase in basic fuel used per mile traveled, is the minimal outcome in all known cases where the brown's gas generator was properly applied and properly tested. 10's of thousands of examples are on the roads of the world, at this writing.

Problem solved, solved by the more intrepid explorers out there.

Nov 10, 2014
And so the AGW Cult shall save the earth.

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