Meteorologists: Cuomo's weather claims are all wet

November 30, 2014 byDavid Klepper
In this Nov. 24, 2014 file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, right, helps resident Nancy Barletta through the snow at her house while surveying the aftermath of a lake-effect snowstorm in West Seneca, N.Y. Cuomo has criticized the National Weather Service for its forecasts of the storm, and said the state is creating its own weather monitoring system. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File )

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says New York is creating the nation's most advanced weather detection system, but meteorologists say his weather service is unlikely to live up to his expectations.

The Democratic governor says the National Weather Service was "off" on its predictions for the storm that dumped 7 feet of snow on parts of the Buffalo area. He says the state's $18.7 million weather monitoring system will allow for more precise detection of weather patterns.

But meteorologists say that while the system will measure current conditions to assess the risk of short-term events like flooding, it won't be able to forecast snowfall days in advance.

To do that, they say, the state would need monitors outside of New York—and a supercomputer to calculate complicated weather models.

In this Nov. 21, 2014 file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo gives a storm update in Cheektowaga, N.Y., after lake-effect snowstorms covered western New York. Cuomo has criticized the National Weather Service for its forecasts of the storm, and said the state is creating its own weather monitoring system. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

Explore further: US northeast braces for flooding after record snow

Related Stories

US northeast braces for flooding after record snow

November 23, 2014

Weather forecasters and emergency officials warned Sunday that melting snow would lead to heavy flooding in parts of the US northeast, with hundreds of thousands of people told to brace for fast-rising waters.

No hype with storm; experts call it the real thing

February 8, 2013

Don't call it hype. The new director of the National Weather Service says some may be getting carried away in describing the winter storm bearing down on the Northeast. But he says the science is simple and chilling.

Recommended for you

Semimetals are high conductors

March 18, 2019

Researchers in China and at UC Davis have measured high conductivity in very thin layers of niobium arsenide, a type of material called a Weyl semimetal. The material has about three times the conductivity of copper at room ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

alfie_null
5 / 5 (4) Nov 30, 2014
Lake effect snow storms are notoriously hard to forecast days in advance. Long term (more than a year) residents of the Buffalo region know that. He might just as well try to drain Lake Erie as try to supersede the National Weather Service.
Shootist
not rated yet Nov 30, 2014
Politician lies.

Film at 11:00

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.