GOES-S satellite EXIS instrument passes final review

November 13, 2014, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
The Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) Flight Model 2 instrument that will fly on NOAA's GOES-S satellite is now complete, and is seen here with the GOES-R EXIS instrument. Credit: NASA/NOAA/Lockheed Martin

One of the instruments that will fly aboard NOAA's GOES-S satellite has completed its final review.

The Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) Flight Model 2 instrument that will fly on NOAA's GOES-S satellite is now complete. The instrument successfully concluded its Pre-Shipment Review on October 21, 2014, at instrument developer Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in Boulder, Colorado. The instrument will be placed into storage until GOES-S spacecraft integration begins.

Earlier this year, the EXIS Flight Model 1 instrument for the GOES-R satellite was installed on the GOES-R spacecraft. The GOES-R satellite is scheduled for launch in early 2016.

The EXIS Flight Model 3 instrument for the GOES-T spacecraft is currently undergoing post-environmental testing calibration.

The GOES-S , along with GOES-R and GOES-T and the future GOES-U, comprise the GOES-R series of satellites. The GOES-R series will be more advanced than NOAA's current GOES fleet. The satellites are expected to more than double the clarity of today's GOES imagery and provide more atmospheric observations than current capabilities with more frequent images.

The advanced spacecraft and technology on the GOES-R series satellites will result in more timely and accurate weather forecasts for NOAA's National Weather Service. It will improve support for the detection and observations of meteorological phenomena, including severe storms and hurricanes. The enhanced data from GOES-R series of satellites will directly affect public safety, protection of property, and ultimately, our nation's economic health and development.

Explore further: GOES-R satellite Magnetometer ready for spacecraft integration

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