UF physicists win two top international awards

October 27, 2014, University of Florida
Hebard, who studies thin films used in superconductors and other applications, shares the Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Physics Prize with scientists from the University of Minnesota, Stanford and the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Each year, the American Physical Society prizes honor the world's leading physicists. This year, two of those coveted awards are going to researchers at the University of Florida.

The society has announced Pierre Ramond and Arthur Hebard – both distinguished professors of physics at UF – as 2015 winners, placing them in the company of past winners from institutions such as Princeton, MIT, Yale, Columbia, Stanford and Cornell, including more than 20 Nobel Prize winners.

Ramond, whose research focuses on supersymmetry and superstring theory, won the Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics, given by the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics on behalf of the Heineman Foundation for Research, Educational, Charitable, and Scientific Purposes.

Arthur Hebard, who studies thin films used in superconductors and other applications, shares the Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Physics Prize with scientists from the University of Minnesota, Stanford and the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Both prizes are considered top honors in their fields.

Ramond, who came to UF in 1980, grew up in Neuilly/Seine, a suburb of Paris, moving to the United States after . After graduating from the Newark College of Engineering in New Jersey with a degree in electrical engineering, he decided to follow his interest in physics and attended Syracuse University, where he received his doctorate in 1969. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Accelerator Laboratory, now the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, where his work formed the basis of supersymmetry and superstring theory, and later taught at Yale and Caltech. His prize citation from the APS notes "pioneering foundational discoveries in supersymmetry and ."

Ramond, whose research focuses on supersymmetry and superstring theory, won the Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics, given by the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics on behalf of the Heineman Foundation for Research, Educational, Charitable, and Scientific Purposes.

Hebard taught at Stanford and worked at Bell Labs before coming to UF in 1996. Despite being placed in remedial math in high school, the native New Yorker graduated magna cum laude from Yale with a degree in , going on to earn a master's and doctorate at Stanford. He credits his success in part to inspiration from his physician father, who encouraged his proclivity to take things apart to see how they worked. Hebard's citation notes his "discovery and pioneering investigations of the superconductor-insulator transition, a paradigm for ."

Ramond's will be formally awarded at the APS annual April meeting in Baltimore, while Hebard's will be given at the organization's annual March meeting in San Antonio.

Explore further: Superstring theorist at University of Florida wins 2015 Heineman Prize

Related Stories

True or false: How well do you know Nobel Prizes?

October 5, 2014

Nobel season is upon us. On Monday, the Nobel Prize judges will begin a series of daily announcements revealing this year's winners. To help avoid any embarrassing water-cooler faux pas, here's a true-or-false guide to the ...

Recommended for you

Physicists reveal why matter dominates universe

March 21, 2019

Physicists in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University have confirmed that matter and antimatter decay differently for elementary particles containing charmed quarks.

ATLAS experiment observes light scattering off light

March 20, 2019

Light-by-light scattering is a very rare phenomenon in which two photons interact, producing another pair of photons. This process was among the earliest predictions of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the quantum theory of ...

How heavy elements come about in the universe

March 19, 2019

Heavy elements are produced during stellar explosion or on the surfaces of neutron stars through the capture of hydrogen nuclei (protons). This occurs at extremely high temperatures, but at relatively low energies. An international ...

Trembling aspen leaves could save future Mars rovers

March 18, 2019

Researchers at the University of Warwick have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even ...

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields

March 15, 2019

A new way of measuring atomic-scale magnetic fields with great precision, not only up and down but sideways as well, has been developed by researchers at MIT. The new tool could be useful in applications as diverse as mapping ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.