Bullying in schools is still prevalent, national report says

Despite a dramatic increase in public awareness and anti-bullying legislation nationwide, the prevalence of bullying is still one of the most pressing issues facing our nation's youth, according to a report by researchers from Clemson University and Professional Data Analysts Inc., and published by the Hazelden Foundation.

"Bullying continues to affect a great number of children in all age groups, with the highest prevalence observed in third and fourth grades, where roughly 22 percent of schoolchildren report that they are bullied two or three times or more per month," said Sue Limber, co-author of the report and professor in the Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life at Clemson.

Research shows that bullying affects individuals across ethnicity, gender, grade and socioeconomic status, whether they live in urban, suburban or rural communities. Bullying can have serious effects during the school years and into adulthood.

Using data collected from the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire, they analyzed a representative sample of more than 200,000 questionnaires administered to students at schools that intended to, but had not yet implemented, the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, an internationally respected anti-bullying program.

The sample included 1,000 girls and 1,000 boys from each grade between third and 12th—and the results were broken down by grade level and gender.

"We found that 18 percent of all students surveyed were involved in bullying others, were bullied by others or both, and that cyberbullying was one of the least common forms of bullying experienced," Limber said.

A substantial proportion of bullied students did not confide in anyone about being bullied, and boys were less likely to confide in others than girls. Although more than 90 percent of girls and 80 percent of boys said they felt sorry for students who are bullied, far fewer reached out to help them.

"Many students also lacked confidence in the administrative and teaching staff to address bullying and, by , less than one-third of bullied students had reported bullying to adults at school," she said. "Although half of in grades three to five believed that school staff often tried to put a stop to it when a student was being bullied, this percentage dropped to just 36 percent by high school."

The researchers say that one of the best tools that schools have for decreasing the problems associated with bullying behavior is to implement evidence-based prevention programs.

"We hope that this report helps teachers, administrators, parents, policymakers and concerned citizens raise national awareness about and improve school environments so every child can feel safe at ," said Limber.


Explore further

Cyberbullying increases as students age

Provided by Clemson University
Citation: Bullying in schools is still prevalent, national report says (2014, October 23) retrieved 26 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-bullying-schools-prevalent-national.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Oct 23, 2014
Addressing bullying is a serious issue that has long been a integrated solution; it is called caste.
If you stand back and look at this issue with as little emotion as possible, it is clearly addressed by social caste. As with religion, any new attemps include the elevation of women, the source of increasing the religion. All do so. Casting defines the status of individuals without the of establishing of face to face dominance. Caste defines status by immediately recognizable appearace. All established civilization have installed castes. In the US we are still passing thru the our economic system that is firming up the lines of money and property. Once caste is established the immediate recognition then defuses bullying. This may sound harsh, but when you look at history do you see anything else?

Oct 23, 2014
In other news, despite massive awareness campaigns by parents, children all around the world continue to misbehave. Now to the weather.

Oct 23, 2014
The reason anti-bullying hasn't worked in schools is simple. The anti-bullying programs were nothing but gay propaganda. .

Consider these facts, the vast number of children bullied are bullied not because they are homosexual, but the vast amount of "anti-bullying" materials/programs, were nothing more than gay acceptance propaganda.

Oct 23, 2014
Ok, let's lock 30-40 kids in a class room and tell them that they have to respect authority or be punished for not complying.

I wonder why they tend to resort to bullying and cliques. Could it be because the initiation of force starts when you force them to comply and expect them to obey.... I swear it's like some of these researchers never grew up like normal children.

Oct 23, 2014
.... Caste defines status by immediately recognizable appearace. All established civilization have installed castes. In the US we are still passing thru the our economic system that is firming up the lines of money and property. Once caste is established the immediate recognition then defuses bullying. This may sound harsh, but when you look at history do you see anything else?


I see a history filled with apologists letting the state run away and do whatever it wants at the expense of another's humanity.

Caste systems only foster more oppression and abject poverty but justifies it by stating that the lower people are trash, so they should accept their position. You just advocated oppression and slavery.

If the US were a caste system from the start, it's probable that you never would have been born.

Oct 23, 2014
Those who promote this anti-bullying nonsense are acting as if we live in an egalitarian utopia, in which everyone looks out for one another, when the exact opposite is true. We live in an ultra-capitalistic, cutthroat, dog-eat-dog society in which the weak are broken like sticks & abandoned to the streets when they fail miserably, to eat out of dumpsters & ultimately die in the gutter.

So tell me, who in our society is preparing kids for this world that we live in, other than bullies? I don't see teachers or even parents teaching kids these harsh lessons of life. They pretend as if society is forgiving, and let kids learn the hard way that it isn't.

Oct 23, 2014
While a certain percentage of bullied victims are irreparably damaged by the experience, I wonder if an equal or even greater number learn important lessons from the experience that they can then use to their own, as well as society's advantage in the future. If the public schools go on another mindless "zero tolerance" binge... why is it the liberals that started out asking for more tolerance, are so fond of "zero tolerance"? ...but I digress.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more