Kiribati leader visits Arctic on climate mission

Kiribati leader visits Arctic on climate mission
In this photo made available by Greenpeace International, President Anote Tong of the Pacific Island nation Kiribati stands during a retreat to the high Arctic glacier Nordenskioldbreen, on Svalbard, Norway. Fearing that his Pacific island nation could be swallowed by a rising ocean, the president of Kiribati says a visit to the melting Arctic has helped him appreciate the scale of the threat. President Anote Tong on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014 ended a Greenpeace-organized tour of glaciers in Norway's Svalbard Archipelago, a trip he said left a deep impression that he would share with world leaders at a U.N. climate summit next week in New York. (AP Photo/Greenpeace International, Christian Aslund)

Fearing that his Pacific island nation could be swallowed by a rising ocean, the president of Kiribati says a visit to the melting Arctic has helped him appreciate the scale of the threat.

President Anote Tong on Saturday ended a Greenpeace-organized tour of glaciers in Norway's Svalbard Archipelago, a trip he said left a deep impression that he would share with world leaders at a U.N. climate summit next week in New York.

"It's a very fascinating sight. In spite of that, what I feel very deeply is the sense of threat," Tong said. "If all of that ice would disappear it would end up eroding our shores."

Scientists say the melt of Arctic glaciers is a key factor in the sea level rise that is threatening island nations such as Kiribati, an impoverished string of 33 coral atolls located about halfway between Hawaii and Australia. Many of its atolls rise just a few feet above sea level.

In a landmark report last year, the U.N.'s expert panel on climate change said oceans could rise by as much as 1 meter (3.3 feet) by the end of this century if no action is taken to cut the blamed for global warming. The summit in New York is meant to build momentum for a global agreement next year to cut emissions.

"It won't take a lot of to affect our islands," Tong said. "We are already having problems."

Tong said he hopes his country won't have to be evacuated. Still, it has bought 20 square kilometers of land in Fiji as "an investment, a guarantee" in case part of the population has to be moved, he said.

  • Kiribati leader visits Arctic on climate mission
    In this photo made available by Greenpeace International, President Anote Tong of the Pacific Island nation Kiribati in front of glacier ice from the retreating glacier Sveabreen on Svalbard. Norway. Fearing that his Pacific island nation could be swallowed by a rising ocean, the president of Kiribati says a visit to the melting Arctic has helped him appreciate the scale of the threat. President Anote Tong on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014 ended a Greenpeace-organized tour of glaciers in Norway's Svalbard Archipelago, a trip he said left a deep impression that he would share with world leaders at a U.N. climate summit next week in New York. (AP Photo/Greenpeace International, Christian Aslund)
  • Kiribati leader visits Arctic on climate mission
    In this photo made available by Greenpeace International, President Anote Tong of the Pacific Island nation Kiribati stands during a retreat to the high Arctic glacier Nordenskioldbreen, on Svalbard, in Norway. Fearing that his Pacific island nation could be swallowed by a rising ocean, the president of Kiribati says a visit to the melting Arctic has helped him appreciate the scale of the threat. President Anote Tong on Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014 ended a Greenpeace-organized tour of glaciers in Norway's Svalbard Archipelago, a trip he said left a deep impression that he would share with world leaders at a U.N. climate summit next week in New York. (AP Photo/Greenpeace International, Christian Aslund)

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Sep 20, 2014
"In a landmark report last year, the U.N.'s expert panel on climate change said oceans could rise by as much as 1 meter (3.3 feet) by the end of this century if no action is taken to cut the greenhouse gas emissions blamed for global warming. The summit in New York is meant to build momentum for a global agreement next year to cut emissions."

Hey Mike here is some of that governmental hyperbole you seem to have so much trouble finding.

Sep 20, 2014
He is at the wrong pole, Arctic is almost all sea ice that has no affect on the level of the oceans.

Sep 20, 2014
How about this doozie ,,, "Scientists say the melt of Arctic glaciers is a key factor in the sea level rise that is threatening island nations....."

All of this is meant to send the tree huggers into and eco trance in order that they might do the bidding of their cult leaders.

Sep 21, 2014
Indian_Curmudgeon,
Actually, most of the ice in the Arctic is ice sheets and glaciers on the land. And those are melting and they do contribute to sea level rise. Yes, maybe he could have gone to Greenland or Antarctica, but the melting of glaciers in Norway is likely to be representative of the overall melting and I'm sure Norway is a nicer place to visit.

Sep 21, 2014
He is at the wrong pole, Arctic is almost all sea ice that has no affect on the level of the oceans.

But it's the "canary in the cage" for AGW.
Where it is having it's greatest effect.

Sep 22, 2014
It is exciting to witness a leader of a tiny nation exhibiting agenda so broad: from
http://www.stuff....-beaches
to climate change.

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