Apple to unveil 'iWatch' on September 9

View of the famous logo at new Apple store in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Februrary 16, 2014
View of the famous logo at new Apple store in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Februrary 16, 2014

Apple will unveil an "iWatch" in September with the maker of the iPhone finally embarking on its much-rumored foray into wearable computing, technology news website Re/code said Wednesday.

The California tech giant is expected to merge style and innovation, along with sensors and computing power, in a wrist-worn device that links wirelessly to iPhones or iPads.

Apple is believed to be planning a September 9 event at which it will introduce the iWatch, along with new-generation iPhone 6 smartphones with increased screen sizes.

The company has not sent out invitations to such an event, nor—as is standard Apple practice—has it commented on reports it will even take place.

Apple's next-generation iPhones are rumored to have screen sizes stretched to 4.7 and 5.5 inches and have faster processors.

Apple typically updates its product cycle in the second half of the year, getting a lift from holiday sales.

Last year it unveiled the iPhone 5S and the lower-priced iPhone 5C in September, getting record sales at the launch.

Apple is tuning a new operating system which allows for and includes a health platform, which could mesh nicely with an "iWatch" for tracking activity, sleep, pulse and more.

The system iOS8 is expected to be in the new iPhones.


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Apple sets Sept 9 iPhone event (Update)

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Citation: Apple to unveil 'iWatch' on September 9 (2014, August 28) retrieved 15 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-apple-unveil-iwatch-september.html
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Aug 28, 2014
Surprised to see a story like this on phys.org. Pretty interesting source, though.

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