Video: How the Dream Chaser was built

Video: How the Dream Chaser was built
The Dream Chaser space plane atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Credit: SNC

The origins of Sierra Nevada Corporation's Dream Chaser go back over 50 years to the US Air Force's and NASA's research into lifting body concepts and the X-20 Dyna-Soar, so this winged, lifting-body spacecraft is one of the tested and reviewed vehicles ever. This new video about the vehicle provides a summary of the development, testing and manufacturing of the Dream Chaser, which will launch on its first orbital testflight in 2016 as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program to provide crew and cargo transportation to the International Space Station.

The Dream Chaser is a classic case of not reinventing the wheel.

"A lot of people told us we needed to get a clear sheet of paper and start all over again," said Mark Sirangelo, the head of Sierra Nevada Space Systems. "We decided we didn't want to do that. We wanted to build on something."

The Dream Chaser—which looks like a mini space shuttle—is the only reusable, lifting-body, human-rated spacecraft capable of landing on a commercial runway. It is about 9 meters long (29.5 feet) with a wingspan of 7 meters (22.9 feet).


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Source: Universe Today
Citation: Video: How the Dream Chaser was built (2014, January 29) retrieved 13 November 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-01-video-chaser-built.html
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