Tech gets in your head, literally, to ease stress

January 10, 2014
Attendees walk around the 2014 International CES at the Las Vegas Convention Center on January 7, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada

Yes, technology can get into your head, says the maker of a new brain-sensing headband that promises to reduced stress.

The Muse headband from Canadian-based Interaxon presented at the Consumer Electronics Show uses seven sensors, including five on the forehead and two behind the ears, to monitor and help people with stress-reducing exercises.

"It's based on neuro feedback," said company communications manager Gena Meldazy.

"The sensors detect and measure changes in your brainwaves." They then transmit this information to a , which enables the user to find ways to relax and reduce stress.

It can deliver results in just a few minutes, for example, "very quickly before an important meeting," Meldazy told AFP.

The system uses a series of training exercises designed to calm and focus the mind, helping keep stress under control.

The product is set to be launched in 2015 at a price of $269, with the company taking preorders at www.getyourmuse.com.

Explore further: InteraXon looking for crowdfunding for Muse, a brainwave-sensor headband (w/ Video)

Related Stories

Brainwave headband makes debut at Paris LeWeb meet

December 5, 2012

(Phys.org)—A Canadian company is talking about having a window, aka computer screen, into your mind. Another of the many ways to put it—they believe your computer can be so into you. And vice-versa. InteraXon, a Canadian ...

Melon focus headband turns to Kickstarter for rollout plans

May 17, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—What if the quality of your work depends more on your focus on the piano keys or canvas or laptop than your musical or painting or computing skills? If target users can be convinced, they will make generous ...

Japan's next gizmo: brainwave-controlled cat ears

June 8, 2011

A team of Japanese inventors have come with a new device that blends the country's fascination with cuteness and its penchant for experimental high-tech -- brainwave-controlled cat ears.

Recommended for you

'Droneboarding' takes off in Latvia

January 22, 2017

Skirted on all sides by snow-clad pine forests, Latvia's remote Lake Ninieris would be the perfect picture of winter tranquility—were it not for the huge drone buzzing like a swarm of angry bees as it zooms above the solid ...

Singapore 2G switchoff highlights digital divide

January 22, 2017

When Singapore pulls the plug on its 2G mobile phone network this year, thousands of people could be stuck without a signal—digital have-nots left behind by the relentless march of technology.

Making AI systems that see the world as humans do

January 19, 2017

A Northwestern University team developed a new computational model that performs at human levels on a standard intelligence test. This work is an important step toward making artificial intelligence systems that see and understand ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.