Limo firm hacked; politician, celeb data breached

November 4, 2013 by Martha Mendoza

An Internet security firm says a limousine software company has been hacked, exposing credit card numbers and potentially embarrassing details about close to 1 million customers, including politicians, star athletes and corporate executives.

Alex Holden, chief information security officer of Milwaukee-based Hold Security, said Monday he discovered the breach at Corporatecaronline and informed its owner more than a month ago.

Holden says customers' , pick-up and drop-off information and other personal details had been stolen.

Corporatecaronline is a limousine software company based in Kirkwood, Mo. Car services buy the software and use it to streamline reservations, dispatching and payments. Owner Dan Leonard didn't return a call for comment.

Explore further: Hackers steal data from 2.9mn Adobe customers

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