EU says school children lack e-learning facilities

September 25, 2013
Pupils use tablets during courses in a classroom at the Leonard de Vinci 'connected' middle school in Saint-Brieuc, western France on September 12, 2013.

With 63 percent of Europe's nine-year-olds in schools missing vital digital equipment, the European Commission launched a vast plan Wednesday to promote e-learning from primary school to universities.

The EU executive said that only half of Europe's 16-year-olds are in digitally well-equipped schools—offering recent equipment, fast broadband and high connectivity—while 20 percent of secondary students have never or almost never used a computer in class.

And while more than 90 percent of Latvian, Lithuanian and Czech shools have Internet access, only 45 percent of schools can offer online access to children in Croatia and Greece.

Universities meanwhile need to increase online learning through MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses), that allow people to access education anywhere, anytime, and through any device.

To help students develop digital skills required for jobs, the Commission said it will provide backing to projects that improve open learning and digital resources under the "Opening up Education" action plan.

Explore further: Panel backs introduction of digital learning in US

Related Stories

Panel backs introduction of digital learning in US

June 13, 2013

An independent panel that studied the lack of technology in America's schools says most students can have access to high-speed Internet even sooner than President Barack Obama is calling for.

Obama pushes plan for fast Internet in US schools

June 6, 2013

President Barack Obama says he wants 99 percent of American students connected to super-fast Internet within five years. He's directing federal regulators to use an existing program to equip schools with broadband Internet.

British universities join online education revolution

September 18, 2013

Dozens of British universities began offering free online courses on Wednesday through a collective portal, joining a global trend started in the United States that opens higher education to the masses.

Recommended for you

Volumetric 3-D printing builds on need for speed

December 11, 2017

While additive manufacturing (AM), commonly known as 3-D printing, is enabling engineers and scientists to build parts in configurations and designs never before possible, the impact of the technology has been limited by ...

Tech titans ramp up tools to win over children

December 10, 2017

From smartphone messaging tailored for tikes to computers for classrooms, technology titans are weaving their way into childhoods to form lifelong bonds, raising hackles of advocacy groups.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Eikka
not rated yet Sep 25, 2013
What exactly is "e-learning"?

Just tossing computers into classrooms doesn't really solve any problem.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.