NASA spacecraft capture an Earth directed coronal mass ejection

NASA spacecraft capture an Earth directed coronal mass ejection
The SOHO LASCO C2 instrument captured this image of the Earth-directed CME. SOHO's coronographs are able to take images of the solar corona by blocking the light coming directly from the Sun with an occulter disk. The location of the actual sun is shown with an image taken by SDO. Credit: ESA & NASA/SOHO, SDO

On August 20, 2013 at 4:24 am EDT, the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection or CME, a solar phenomenon which can send billions of tons of particles into space that can reach Earth one to three days later. These particles cannot travel through the atmosphere to harm humans on Earth, but they can affect electronic systems in satellites and on the ground.

Experimental NASA research models, based on observations from NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory show that the CME left the sun at speeds of around 570 miles per second, which is a fairly typical speed for CMEs.

Earth-directed CMEs can cause a space called a geomagnetic storm, which occurs when they funnel energy into Earth's magnetic envelope, the magnetosphere, for an extended period of time. The CME's magnetic fields peel back the outermost layers of Earth's fields changing their very shape. In the past, geomagnetic storms caused by CMEs of this strength have usually been mild.

Magnetic storms can degrade communication signals and cause unexpected electrical surges in power grids. They also can cause aurora.

NASA spacecraft capture an Earth directed coronal mass ejection
The SOHO LASCO C3 instrument captured this coronographic image of the Earth-directed CME. The bright white object to the right is the planet Mercury. Credit: ESA & NASA/SOHO

NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center is the U.S. government's official source for space weather forecasts, alerts, watches and warnings.


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Sun erupts with a CME toward Earth and Mercury

Citation: NASA spacecraft capture an Earth directed coronal mass ejection (2013, August 20) retrieved 21 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-08-nasa-spacecraft-capture-earth-coronal.html
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Aug 20, 2013
So when do our cell fones either stop working or all do 'dial-a-crooked-politician/republican' at once?

Aug 21, 2013
On August 20, 2013 at 4:24 am EDT, the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection or CME, a solar phenomenon which can send billions of tons of particles into space that can reach Earth one to three days later.

I wonder what those particles look like? Something like this?
http://www.plasma...sTPS.pdf

These particles cannot travel through the atmosphere to harm humans on Earth, but they can affect electronic systems in satellites and on the ground.

They may not harm humans, but are we sure they can't get into the atmosphere? Oddly, similar nanodust has been found to be deposited in severe weather.

http://arxiv.org/...4004.pdf

Aug 21, 2013
Hey, look, cantdrive finally commented on an article related to plasma.

Although I think he missed the point that it IS plasma that is heading toward us.

I think you missed the point that I'm not claiming otherwise, but I guess you'd actually have to read the papers to understand that.

Aug 21, 2013

Well, according to you, the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society and the IAEA endorse "junk science". Can you say anti-science Luddite?

yep
Aug 27, 2013
Rug you are the definition of a tool. I read the IEEE article posted above with the 2007 copyright and realized like the classic quote... "you see things not as they are, but as you are". Which means the crap you see is the stuff your head is filled with, which is probably why you are so angry.

Gmr
Aug 27, 2013
Thanks to the crowd here, any time I hear or read "Z-pinch" I suffix it mentally. It's impossible for me to take it seriously, really - and I'm sure there is some good to be had from plasma physics, but between EU/PU folks, I'm beginning to develop an unhealthy dislike of plasma in general. Neon tubes annoy me with their buzzing, the sun does its mocking dance through the sky.

I'm really no longer enamored with plasma as I once was. And I blame phys.org's comments.

Aug 27, 2013
any time I hear or read "Z-pinch" I suffix it mentally. It's impossible for me to take it seriously

OK, I'll start referring to it with it's other description, the Bennett pinch.

yep
Sep 06, 2013
A reprint makes something less valid?
Think about your statement "No one seems to care at all that the evidence shows the opposite of what they claim" Be mindful of this and then you will understand cantdrive. Most of you have excepted Big Bang, Black Holes, and Internally Powered Fusion Suns these priori- constructed language are your faith and is unwavering and hardened like any zealots. Todays truths are tomorrows myths. Read Thomas Kuhn because you want to educate yourself. Let the anger go remember you have people that love you.
One of the most ironic things about all this is how much diagrams of black holes look like the "Bennett pinch"!

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