Pact curbs seismic surveys in Gulf of Mexico

June 21, 2013

Oil and gas companies working in the Gulf of Mexico have agreed not to use seismic surveys for the next 30 months in three areas considered critical to whales and along the coast during the calving season for bottlenose dolphins.

The agreement among three environmental groups, several trade groups and the U.S. Interior Department was filed Thursday afternoon in federal court in New Orleans.

Michael Jasny of the Council says the 30-month period will give the government and industry time for required environmental studies and research.

Environmental groups say the surveys, involving repeated bangs by air guns, can damage whales and baby dolphins.

Eric Milito of the American Petroleum Institute says the industry agreed to the measures although it feels the risk of harm is minor.

Explore further: Agency stops seismic tests; worries about dolphins

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