Living with flood risk

In this issue of Planning Theory and Practice, our Interface section explores a shift from a 'keep flood water out' approach towards a long-term strategy of mitigating flood risk and increasing the resilience of our communities to flooding. Rather than simply ensuring 'community bounce back' in the aftermath of flooding, this Interface shows us the importance of transforming the built environment in the face of uncertain risk.

Drawing on case studies in the UK, Ireland, Australia and Bangladesh, this Interface examines a range of policy and responses to flood risk. These include the importance of retrofitting the built environment to better cope with flood risk, housing allocations that recognize the constraints imposed by floodplains, planning for a more hydrologically-sensitive , and urban realignment schemes that provide space for natural flooding processes.

Just as important as these physical and design-led approaches, the authors also emphasise the central role of integrated policy responses, social learning and capacity building to effectively involve those people at risk - who are being gradually transformed into active risk managers.

"Although a series of flood disasters provide useful learning experiences, it is not sustainable to continually suffer detriment before action occurs." Planning Theory and Practice, Mark Scott et al, published by Taylor & Francis.

For both planning practitioners and researchers, the Interface 'Living With Flood Risk' offers evidence from existing cases as well as critical commentary and synthesis on how communities should prepare and transform in the face of .


Explore further

Go with the flow in flood prediction

More information: www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/1 … 14649357.2012.761904
Provided by Taylor & Francis
Citation: Living with flood risk (2013, April 4) retrieved 3 June 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2013-04-living-with-flood-risk.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
1 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments