Google tests same-day delivery shopping service

Google logo is seen on December 4, 2012 in Saint-Denis, Paris
Google logo is seen on December 4, 2012 in Saint-Denis, Paris. Google on Thursday began testing a service for same-day delivery of toys, clothing, groceries or other items ordered online in what could be a challenge to online retail titan Amazon.

Google on Thursday began testing a service for same-day delivery of toys, clothing, groceries or other items ordered online in what could be a challenge to online retail titan Amazon.

People living in San Francisco or a swath of from the cities of San Jose to San Mateo were invited to take part in "a new experiment" that the Internet colossus dubbed Google Shopping Express.

"It's a local delivery service that we hope will make it possible for you to get the items you order online the same day, and at a low cost," product management director Tom Fallows said in a blog post.

"The pilot will expand as we work out the kinks."

The service is part of an effort by the Mountain View, California-based firm to "bring the speed of the Web to the real world," according to Fallows.

People enrolled in the test program will be able to shop at a single online venue for products from retailers such as Target, Walgreens, American Eagle, Toys R Us, and San Francisco's coveted Blue Bottle Coffee.

"So hopefully, no more trips across town for simple errands," Fallows said.

Pricing for Express had yet to be determined so people testing the service were being offered six months of free, unlimited orders for same-day deliveries.

Amazon entices shoppers with a Prime service that offers free two-day shipping on orders along with online streaming of films and television shows for an annual of $79.


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Mar 28, 2013
Just think of the increase in fuel consumption made necessary by this sop for the utterly impatient and planning-challenged.

If you can't wait a day for a discretionary purchase, then, in the simplest terms, you don't deserve it.

Mar 28, 2013
I think this, contrary to the above statement, will increase fuel efficiency on normal purchases from a local retailer as mentioned in the article. Cutting down on the number of back and forth trips a person does, wasting gas, when a delivery truck could make the stop and many others after leaving a central facility.

Deserving of a material item, in a general sense is only regulated by the value of your work and what you are willing to spend the money earned from it on. Do the work, earn the money, deserve what you can afford.

I think its an interesting concept but I also think that it is unlikely to take off, as I would imagine the same day service to have an extremely large cost to google, the rush processing and delivery might make the expenditure quite high for same day service, however it is only local so it might be viable. All in all its a smart play if they can make it work, who wants to drive to target and waste valuable time if they don't have to.

Mar 29, 2013
I think this, contrary to the above statement, will increase fuel efficiency on normal purchases from a local retailer as mentioned in the article. Cutting down on the number of back and forth trips a person does, wasting gas, when a delivery truck could make the stop and many others after leaving a central facility.


My point was that, just how efficient can route-planning be for same-day delivery? As you say, there will likely be a hefty convenience fee for the service, and someone else will just have to drive to target instead of you.

since there will prolly be limited demand for the service, an inefficient delivery van or box truck will be wasting fuel driving around to various retailers and then to homes scattered throughout the area.

I.e. -wasted resources for hapless morons, and only high volume could possibly begin to justify this enterprise as creating a net fuel-savings.


Mar 29, 2013
Not a bad point; prolly is not a word.

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