Earth-directed coronal mass ejection from the sun

Earth-directed coronal mass ejection from the sun
The ESA and NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured these images of the sun spitting out a coronal mass ejection (CME) on March 15, 2013, from 3:24 to 4:00 a.m. EDT. This type of image is known as a coronagraph, since a disk is placed over the sun to better see the dimmer atmosphere around it, called the corona. Credit: ESA&NASA/SOHO
(Phys.org) —On March 15, 2013, at 2:54 a.m. EDT, the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection (CME), a solar phenomenon that can send billions of tons of solar particles into space and can reach Earth one to three days later and affect electronic systems in satellites and on the ground. Experimental NASA research models, based on observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and ESA/NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, show that the CME left the sun at speeds of around 900 miles per second, which is a fairly fast speed for CMEs. Historically, CMEs at this speed have caused mild to moderate effects at Earth.

The NASA research models also show that the CME may pass by the Spitzer and Messenger spacecraft. NASA has notified their mission operators. There is, however, only minor associated with this event, which is what would normally concern operators of interplanetary spacecraft since the particles can trip on board computer electronics.

Not to be confused with a solar flare, a CME is a solar phenomenon that can send solar particles into space and reach Earth one to three days later. Earth-directed CMEs can cause a space called a geomagnetic storm, which occurs when they connect with the outside of the Earth's magnetic envelope, the magnetosphere, for an extended period of time. In the past, geomagnetic storms caused by CMEs such as this one have usually been of mild to medium strength.


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Citation: Earth-directed coronal mass ejection from the sun (2013, March 15) retrieved 18 April 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-earth-directed-coronal-mass-ejection-sun.html
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Mar 15, 2013
a CME is a solar phenomenon that can send solar particles into space and reach Earth one to three days later. Earth-directed CMEs can cause a space weather phenomenon called a geomagnetic storm, which occurs when they connect with the outside of the Earth's magnetic envelope, the magnetosphere, for an extended period of time.

And in one to three days, expect some of this energy to be imparted upon the Earth and be on the look out for increased geologic and extreme weather activity.

Mar 15, 2013
Co-incidentally, I felt a distinctive electrostatic shock that kind of clicked in the back of my head, night before last, while lying in my bed. I thought that North Korea had finally carried out their threat for a pre-emptive nuclear strike and looked for a news story in the morning, but, nothing. I now theorize that I must have felt the shock wave of the event that produced that mass coronal ejection, vindicating the thesurfaceofthesun.com's theory that the sun's energy fields are electrical in nature, and not magnetic, which is the current paradigm.

Mar 15, 2013
Here cantdrive, this is a running tally of global earthquakes 2.5 and above for the last 7 days. It is updated every minute.

http://earthquake...kes/map/

Let us know when you see the increased geologic and extreme weather.

Mar 15, 2013
I'm very familiar with that site, I would suggest filtering out quakes 5.5 and below. I'll admit the weather activity will be difficult to confirm, there are countless ways this can materialize. There are however quite a few correlations between EF-5 tornadoes and solar activity (see Joplin 2011, Alabama 2011 outbreak).

yep
Mar 16, 2013
The reason these loops are misunderstood is the solar model is based on The Internal Constitution of the Stars by Eddington in 1926. Considering the work done by Jacobsen, Carlqvist, and Alfven,and Juergens you think we would have a different view by now. When the voyager spacecrafts pierced the interstellar boundary the findings conformed to Alfven's circuit theory. The giant loops are flows of charged particles. http://solarscien...slcn.mov When these loops break they create Langmuir bursts, incorrectly labeled as magnetic reconnection. http://spp.astro....muir.pdf

Mar 16, 2013
The M-1 flare hit the same day but the cme won't arrive for 1-2 days. For the record, whenever there is an earth facing coronal hole the solar wind picks up. Whenever you get a large, earth facing flare and cme right before a coronal hole-you will see increased seismic activity almost 100% of the time. Remember 3/11/2011? There are many more...

Mar 16, 2013
Changed weather would be one effect but then if Nassim Haramein is right it may be much much more.

.....................youtube.com/watch?v=HNByglVrQG8

Mar 17, 2013
For those with more active math skills than myself:

The article on the NASA site states, "On March 15, 2013, at 2:54 a.m. EDT, the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection (CME), a solar phenomenon that can send billions of tons of solar particles into space and can reach Earth one to three days later"

If so, how many pounds of solar particles will actually reach Earth?

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