Brainwave headband makes debut at Paris LeWeb meet

Brainwave headband makes debut at Paris LeWeb meet
(Phys.org)—A Canadian company is talking about having a window, aka computer screen, into your mind. Another of the many ways to put it—they believe your computer can be so into you. And vice-versa. InteraXon, a Canadian company, is focused on making a business out of mind-control technology via a headband device, and they are planning to launch this as a $199 brainwave computer controller called Muse. The company is running an Indiegogo campaign to obtain needed funds. Muse is a Bluetooth-connected headset with four electroencephalography sensors, communicating with the person's computer via the Bluetooth connection.

One potential headband advantage would be using one's brainwaves to control games. The brainwave-sensing headband was introduced by the company's Ariel Garten, , in Paris Tuesday at the LeWeb 12 conference.

The company is making a software developer kit available so that developers can write their own software."We invite everyone to help unlock the potential of the technology alongside us," she said.

At the time of this writing they raised $237,515 out of their goal of $150,000. Their estimated shipping date for Muse is June 2013.

InteraXon's team says the headset working by turning brainwaves into binary ones and zeros. "We're like interpreters fluent in the language of the mind: our system analyzes the frequency of your brainwaves and then translates them into a control signal for the computer to understand."

Having worked on their headset since 2007, their finished design calls for two on the forehead and two sensors behind the ears. Muse uses sensors to pick up the tiny electrical outputs generated by the brain's activity. As the mind shifts between concentration and relaxation, Muse's algorithms detect the changes in the brain and show those changes in real time. Those lending support for the concept indicate that the headset has more potential than becoming just a fun gadget. In the company's promotional video, a Stanford MD notes that the ability to "look at your own mind" and understand the effects of activities can be quite useful.

One can see one's own brainwaves in action and use that information to improve and strengthen the mind. The InteraXon team will continue to explore using to interact with real-world devices.

Along with offering Muse, they have an integrated brain health application and the Software Development Kit.


Explore further

InteraXon looking for crowdfunding for Muse, a brainwave-sensor headband (w/ Video)

More information: www.indiegogo.com/interaxonmuse

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Citation: Brainwave headband makes debut at Paris LeWeb meet (2012, December 5) retrieved 19 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-brainwave-headband-debut-paris-leweb.html
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Dec 05, 2012
Article says:-
..Stanford MD notes that the ability to "look at your own mind" and understand the effects of activities can be quite useful.
Too true and in many combinatorial permutations, could be a pandora's box for hackers too, so as in all things '..be aware so one can beware for we are as much a storm as nature..'
Cheers

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