Ericsson sues Samsung in US for patent infringement

With the use of smartphones surging worldwide, courts are frequently being asked to rule to settle skirmishes
This picture taken on November 7, 2012 shows Ericsson headquarters in Stockholm's suburb of Kista. The Swedish telecommunications equipment maker said that it was suing South Korean rival Samsung in a US court for violating patents.

Swedish telecommunications equipment maker Ericsson said that it was suing South Korean rival Samsung in a US court for violating patents.

"Ericsson has today filed a lawsuit in the United States against Samsung for infringing its patents, after nearly two years of negotiations failed to reach an agreement," a statement said Tuesday.

"The dispute concerns both Ericsson's that is essential to several telecommunications and networking standards used by Samsung's products as well as other of Ericsson's patented inventions that are frequently implemented in wireless and ," it added.

Samsung has also gone to court in Britain, Japan, The Netherlands and the United States amid disputes with the US computer giant Apple over technology used in mobile phones and .

Samsung's positions have been backed up by courts in most of those cases.

With the use of smartphones in particular surging worldwide, courts are frequently being asked to rule to settle skirmishes in a long-running global patent war between the high-tech giants which have accused each other of stealing intellectual property.


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(c) 2012 AFP

Citation: Ericsson sues Samsung in US for patent infringement (2012, November 27) retrieved 14 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-ericsson-sues-samsung-patent-infringement.html
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