Solar geoengineering can be tailored to reduce inequality or to manage specific risks, study suggests

Solar geoengineering can be tailored to reduce inequality or to manage specific risks, study suggests
This shows a sunset in the Arctic. A new study at Harvard explores the feasibility of using cautious and targeted solar geoengineering to counter the loss of Arctic sea ice. Credit: NASA/Kathryn Hansen

By tailoring geoengineering efforts by region and by need, a new model promises to maximize the effectiveness of solar radiation management while mitigating its potential side effects and risks. Developed by a team of leading researchers, the study was published in the November issue of Nature Climate Change.

Solar geoengineering, the goal of which is to offset the global warming caused by , involves reflecting sunlight back into space. By increasing the concentrations of aerosols in the stratosphere or by creating low-altitude marine clouds, the as-yet hypothetical solar geoengineering projects would scatter incoming away from the Earth's surface.

Critics of geoengineering have long warned that such a global intervention would have unequal effects around the world and could result in unforeseen consequences. They argue that the potential gains may not be worth the risk.

"Our research goes a step beyond the one-size-fits-all approach to explore how careful tailoring of solar geoengineering can reduce possible inequalities and risks," says co-author David Keith, Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School. "Instead, we can be thoughtful about various tradeoffs to achieve more selective results, such as the trade-off between minimizing global climate changes and minimizing residual changes at the worst-off location."

The study—developed in collaboration with Douglas G. MacMartin of the California Institute of Technology, Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution for Science, and Ben Kravitz, formerly of Carnegie and now at the Department of Energy—explores the feasibility of using solar geoengineering to counter the loss of Arctic sea ice.

"There has been a lot of loose talk about region-specific climate modification. By contrast, our research uses a more systematic approach to understand how geoengineering might be used to limit a specific impact. We found that tailored solar geoengineering might limit loss with several times less total solar shading than would be needed in a uniform case."

Generally speaking, greenhouse gases tend to suppress precipitation, and an offsetting reduction in the amount of sunlight absorbed by Earth would not restore this precipitation. Both greenhouse gases and aerosols affect the distribution of heat and rain on this planet, but they change the temperature and precipitation in different ways in different places. The researchers suggest that varying the amount of sunlight deflected away from the Earth both regionally and seasonally could combat some of this problem.

"These results indicate that varying geoengineering efforts by region and over different periods of time could potentially improve the effectiveness of solar geoengineering and reduce climate impacts in at-risk areas," says co-author Ken Caldeira, Senior Scientist in the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science.

The researchers note that while their study used a state-of-the-art model, any real-world estimates of the possible impact of management would need to take into account various uncertainties. Further, any interference in Earth's climate system, whether intentional or unintentional, is likely to produce unanticipated outcomes.

"While more work needs to be done, we have a strong model that indicates that solar might be used in a far more nuanced manner than the uniform one-size-fits-all implementation that is often assumed. One might say that one need not think of it as a single global thermostat. This gives us hope that if we ever do need to implement engineered solutions to combat global warming, that we would do so with a bit more confidence and a great ability to test it and control it."


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More information: The authors declare no competing financial interests.
Journal information: Nature Climate Change

Provided by Harvard University
Citation: Solar geoengineering can be tailored to reduce inequality or to manage specific risks, study suggests (2012, October 21) retrieved 22 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-solar-geoengineering-tailored-inequality-specific.html
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Oct 21, 2012
NB In a related Press Release the Reports author Ken Caldeira concludes "We have to expect the unexpected," Caldeira added. "The safest way to reduce climate risk is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions." http://www.eureka...1812.php

Oct 22, 2012
The story of how terraforming started unravels before our eyes.

Oct 22, 2012
Critics of geoengineering have long warned that such a global intervention would have unequal effects around the world and could result in unforeseen consequences. They argue that the potential gains may not be worth the risk.

Damn right. I love technology, but we shouldn't start messing with things we cannot clean up if things go pear shaped.

And if things do go wrong then the consequences will likely not be on the country deploying this stuff. Which will just lead to declarations of war (if we're lucky) or global 'terraforming wars' where nations use such methods on each other (if we're unlucky)

If they absolutely want to try something then put big mylar screens into orbit. At the very least those can be discarded/taken down if unforeseen consequences rear their heads.

Perhaps before they consider "putting aerosols in the stratosphere to reflect incoming sunlight back into space", they should halt the existing chemtrail operations which have been making matters worse for the last seventeen plus years.

Chemtrails: The Hidden Truth
upwardvectorpubs.com/55zgw3.htm


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