US judge lifts Samsung tablet ban

Jury agreed that Samsung did not abuse Apple design patents
Samsung Electronics' tablet computer, the Galaxy Tab 10.1, is pictured during its launch at the company's headquarters in Seoul, in 2011. A judge on Monday lifted a ban on US sales of Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 computers as legal brawling continued between the South Korean electronics titan and Apple.

A judge on Monday lifted a ban on US sales of Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1 computers as the South Korean firm added Apple's new iPhone 5 to a patent brawl between the two market rivals.

US Lucy Koh issued an order clearing the way for Samsung to restart sales of the Tab 10.1 tablets that were halted while it dueled with Apple in a high-stakes trial.

A jury declared on August 24 that Samsung should pay Apple $1.049 billion in damages for illegally copying and iPad features, in one of the biggest patent cases in decades—a verdict that could have huge market repercussions.

However, the jury agreed that Samsung did not abuse that were the grounds for a temporary ban on Galaxy Tab 10.1 imports that Koh put in place at Apple's behest in June.

"The sole basis for the June 26 no longer exists," Koh wrote in her ruling. "The court finds it proper to dissolve the injunction."

In a statement, Samsung welcomed the ruling, saying it "vindicates our position that there was no infringement of Apple's design patent and that an injunction was not called for."

Samsung had steadfastly denied the charges by Apple, claiming it developed its devices independently
This file photo shows a Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet (R) and an iPad 2. A judge on Monday lifted a ban on US sales of Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 computers as legal brawling continued between the South Korean electronics titan and Apple.
However, Koh denied a request by Samsung for $2.6 million that Apple had posted as a bond to "pay the costs and damages sustained by any party found to have been wrongfully enjoined or restrained."

The court will hold onto the bond cash pending resolution of post-verdict legal motions that could bear on whether the ban was a wrongful restraint.

Koh is on record noting that the August in her San Jose, California, did not represent a "final ruling" in the case since it was being appealed.

Samsung reacted by saying the verdict was "a loss" for consumers and that Apple had "manipulated" the .

Meanwhile, Samsung said Tuesday that it had added Apple's new to a list of products it believes infringe its patents in a second case the two smartphone giants are fighting in the same California court.

"We have always preferred to compete in the marketplace with our innovative products, rather than in courtrooms," Samsung said.

Samsung and Apple have been at loggerheads over dozens of patent lawsuits in 10 nations
This file photo shows a customer holding Apple iPhone 5 smartphones at a telephone operator's shop in Rome, in September. Samsung said on Tuesday that it had added Apple's new iPhone 5 to a list of products it believes infringe its patents.

"However, Apple continues to take aggressive legal measures that will limit market competition. Under these circumstances, we have little choice but to take the steps necessary to protect our innovations," it added.

The new iPhone went on sale around the world last month and enjoyed a record launch weekend, with sales topping five million.

Samsung and Apple—respectively the world's number one and two smartphone makers—have been at loggerheads over dozens of patent lawsuits in 10 nations, accusing each other of copying technologies and designs.

The August verdict in California affected a range of Samsung products, including some of its popular Galaxy smartphones.

Samsung has steadfastly denied the patent infringement charges by Apple, claiming it developed its devices independently. It unsuccessfully argued that Apple infringed on its wireless patents.


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US judge won't lift Samsung tablet ban

(c) 2012 AFP

Citation: US judge lifts Samsung tablet ban (2012, October 2) retrieved 23 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-samsung-tablet.html
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Oct 02, 2012
Samsung should just refuse to produce chips for any of Apple's Filth.

Oct 02, 2012
Samsung should just refuse to produce chips for any of Apple's Filth.
A nice vengeful idea - but would harm its (i.e. Samsung's) own business too. And there is way too much lurking "competitors" willing to collaborate..;-) If you lose a market share in this area, you may it lose for ever.. Not to say, Apple would impeach the Samsung from violation of contract agreements immediately and such a game would end pretty costly for Samsung.

Oct 02, 2012
When you consider the size of the two companies, the money involved is like two people going to small claims court over a fender-bender. But they are establishing the validity of a bunch of ridiculous patents that will be useful in preventing smaller companies from rising up to compete.

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