No-battery lantern uses water and salt for light

No-battery lantern uses water and salt for light
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(Phys.org)—From young science students taking their cups and metals to the lab, to older inventors demonstrating their prototypes, it is no secret that salt water can be utilized as a conductor of electricity. Japan's Green House company is still managing to surprise everyone with its upcoming LED lantern that runs on just salt and water. Its forgettable product title is for a device that is simple enough. The "GH-LED10WBW" does not need any dry cell or rechargeable battery. Using a dedicated water bag, the water and salt once placed in the lantern produces light, pure and simple. The lantern can generate electricity for eight hours per charge of water. You just keep refilling the bag every eight hours for continued light. Inside the lantern is a magnesium rod, negative electrode, and a carbon rod, positive electrode.

The magnesium rod can be used for up to 120 hours of power generation. One can replace this rod, which is to be separately sold. The lantern goes on sale this month.

What is drawing added interest is that the lantern can double as a charger as well as light source. A USB port, on the casing could be used to plug in a smartphone or some other device in the event of a .

The company behind the lantern, Green House, prides itself on being "green." The company pledge is to enforce and implement "Green Policy" in its products, from using recyclable materials to generating less .

No pricing information was available at the time of this writing.


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Citation: No-battery lantern uses water and salt for light (2012, September 5) retrieved 1 June 2020 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-no-battery-lantern-salt.html
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