In US, 19 mn can't get high-speed Internet: study

Around six percent of the US population, or 19 million people, lack access to high-speed Internet
Around six percent of the US population, or 19 million people, lack access to high-speed Internet even though deployment has improved in recent years, a government study said Tuesday.

Around six percent of the US population, or 19 million people, lack access to high-speed Internet even though deployment has improved in recent years, a government study said Tuesday.

Around 14.5 million of those without access to broadband are in rural areas, the report said. And in native American tribal areas, about 30 percent do not have access to high-speed Internet.

The FCC report was the eighth annual study on broadband, which is seen as important for jobs, and .

The report said that even though most Americans can get high-speed access, roughly 100 million Americans still do not subscribe and that further steps should be taken toward the goal of making broadband available in homes, schools and businesses.

The report said private firms have invested more than $1 trillion in high-speed data services and the FCC has promoted a program of Internet access for low-income Americans, but that more progress is needed.

"The report's conclusions only reaffirm what I hear all too often from , parents, educators and others across the country -- we can't let up on our efforts to unleash the benefits of broadband for every American," said Julius Genachowski.

"Increasing broadband deployment, increasing adoption, increasing speeds and capacity are vital throughout our country; they're essential to growing our innovation economy and driving our global competitiveness."


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(c) 2012 AFP

Citation: In US, 19 mn can't get high-speed Internet: study (2012, August 21) retrieved 21 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-mn-high-speed-internet.html
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Aug 21, 2012
Is 'mn' the usual abbreviation for 'million'? I've never seen that one used.

Aug 22, 2012
The problem isn't America, it's that telecommunications companies aren't willing to stretch the fiber out to the "last mile" because it does not get them enough money to be economically viable. It's purely profit driven.

And that's not to say they don't have internet they just don't have "high speed internet", whatever that means.

It doesn't say where those 19 million people are located in the US but I bet it is in the Mid-West, where you have fewer people per square mile.

Aug 22, 2012
Oh wow, 19 million out of 300 million.

I don't know if you Europeans realize this, but America is fucking BIG... we still have quite a few towns in rural areas with only hundreds of people and no major stores or anything for many miles around. I grew up in a town that STILL has quite a few dirt roads that are traveled by horses more frequently than cars. Some people live way the hell out in the middle of nowhere, and of course telecom companies are not going to run fiber for 50 kilometers to reach a dozen POTENTIAL customers.

Aug 22, 2012
The socialist states of Japan, South Korea, Malasia, Singapore, Tailand, etc. don't seem to be having cost problems in doing fiber to the last mile and being profitable


Wow... you are so confused... they don't have to be profitable, they are government subsidized or outright owned.

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