New economic electric water cooling pump for automobiles

New economic electric water cooling pump for automobiles
Aisin Seki electric water cooling pump installed in engine (red circle) © Aisin Seiki

The low cost, high efficiency electric pump offers an environmentally friendly alternative to mechanical counterparts. Aisin Seki Co., Ltd has now successfully developed a smaller, cheaper electric cooling pump through some effective efficiency optimisations.

Cars traditionally use mechanical water cooling pumps, which have a flow rate dependent on the engine speed. Electric cooling pumps offer greater control over the water flow allowing significant fuel economies, particularly important in view of rising environmental concerns. However electric pumps are traditionally much larger than their mechanical counterparts.

Among other adaptations, the Aisin electric pump uses a newly shaped impeller to improve performance. In addition, the design positions the components so that both the motor efficiency and the centrifugal pump mutually benefit. The pump also uses fewer components, allowing it to occupy less space.

With the efficiency improvements less heat is generated. The pump design also incorporates an aluminium enclosure, which acts as a heat sink, further easing the requirements. Notably, the cost of the electric pump was reduced by using an inexpensive and heat resistant .

The new engine pump will allow significant fuel economies, reducing , and the expense of running the engine. It has been designed so that it can be installed in the same position as mechanical pumps, thereby simplifying the move to electric powered pumps.


Explore further

U.S. scientists develop better heat pump

Provided by Aisin Seki Co.
Citation: New economic electric water cooling pump for automobiles (2012, August 31) retrieved 19 September 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-economic-electric-cooling-automobiles.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Sep 06, 2012
There are energy losses in the motor windings so this is not the best answer. A magnet rotor on the crankshaft would drive a pump impeller with magnets on it and no seal would be needed making the water pump almost frictionless and the only heat generated would be from moving the water. The pump is housed in plastic so there are no eddy currents induced by the magnets.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more