Goodbye La Nina: Will drought, hurricanes also go?

(AP) -- The La Nina weather phenomenon is over. Forecasters say that's good news for the drought in the South and hurricane areas along the coasts.

The pronounced the two-year La Nina (NEEN'-yah) finished on Thursday. La Nina is the flip side of (NEEN'-yoh) and is caused by the cooling of the central Pacific Ocean. La Nina's greatest effects are in the winter, usually triggering drought in the U.S. South and more rain further north. It also often means more in the Atlantic during the summer. Global temperatures are cooler during La Ninas, especially in the tropics

Meteorologists reported some drought relief in Texas earlier this year. But recently drought conditions intensified again in parts of Texas and much of the Southeast.

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La Nina going away, but too late for Texas drought

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