Two UK accused of stealing Jackson music from Sony

March 5, 2012 By JILL LAWLESS , Associated Press

(AP) -- Two men have been charged in Britain with hacking into Sony Music's computers and stealing music, the company and British police said Monday. A person familiar with the situation said the hackers had obtained unreleased Michael Jackson tracks.

Sony Entertainment spokeswoman Liz Young said the company noticed a breach of its systems in May, "and immediately took steps to secure the site and notify authorities. As a result, the two suspects were arrested."

She said no were compromised in the attack on the company's internal music-sharing system.

Sony would not confirm how much music was stolen or what artists were involved. But a person familiar with the situation, who was not authorized to speak publicly, said Monday that the suspects were Jackson fans and had taken his music, including unreleased material.

The year after the King of Pop's 2009 death, Sony signed a 7-year deal with his estate, worth up to $250 million, to sell his unreleased recordings.

Britain's Serious Organized Crime Agency said two suspects were arrested in May and charged in September with computer misuse and copyright offenses.

James Marks, 26, and James McCormick, 25, appeared at Leicester Crown Court in central England on Friday and pleaded not guilty. They were freed on bail and are due to stand trial in January.

The case is not believed to be linked to Anonymous or Lulz Security - loose-knit hackers' collectives, broadly sympathetic to the WikiLeaks' secret-spilling site - who have targeted government and corporate websites around the world.

Last year, hackers targeted Sony Playstation and networks, compromising personal information, email addresses and the security of millions of users accounts. At the time, Lulz Security claimed responsibility for the hack.

Explore further: Hackers claim another Sony attack

0 shares

Related Stories

Hackers claim another Sony attack

June 7, 2011

Hackers claimed to have staged another attack on Japanese electronics giant Sony, publishing online a file containing source code for the Sony Computer Entertainment Developer Network.

Hackers claim new Sony cyberattack

June 3, 2011

Hackers have claimed to have compromised more than one million passwords, email addresses and other information from SonyPictures.com in the latest cyberattack on the Japanese electronics giant.

More Sony websites hacked, 8,500 Greek accounts hit

May 24, 2011

Sony on Tuesday said its websites in three countries had been hacked with 8,500 Greek user accounts compromised, in a blow to efforts to restore confidence after a huge data breach affecting millions.

Former US official to head cybersecurity at Sony

September 6, 2011

Japanese electronics giant Sony, which suffered a huge data breach this year, named a former top US Department of Homeland Security official on Tuesday to lead its cybersecurity efforts.

Sony removes data posted by hackers

May 7, 2011

Sony said Saturday about 2,500 customers' names and partial addresses stolen by hackers had been discovered posted online as it struggled to recover from the biggest-ever Internet security break-in.

FBI arrests suspect over Sony hacking

September 22, 2011

The FBI on Thursday arrested a member of the LulzSec hacking group suspected over a massive cyberattack earlier this year on Japanese electronics giant Sony, officials said.

Recommended for you

Google, EU dig in for long war

July 20, 2017

Google and the EU are gearing up for a battle that could last years, with the Silicon Valley behemoth facing a relentless challenge to its ambition to expand beyond search results.

Strengthening 3-D printed parts for real-world use

July 20, 2017

From aerospace and defense to digital dentistry and medical devices, 3-D printed parts are used in a variety of industries. Currently, 3-D printed parts are very fragile and only used in the prototyping phase of materials ...

Swimming robot probes Fukushima reactor to find melted fuel

July 19, 2017

An underwater robot entered a badly damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant Wednesday, capturing images of the harsh impact of its meltdown, including key structures that were torn and knocked out of place.

Microsoft cloud to help Baidu self-driving car effort

July 19, 2017

Microsoft's cloud computing platform will be used outside China for collaboration by members of a self-driving car alliance formed by Chinese internet search giant Baidu, the companies announced on Tuesday.

Making lab equipment on the cheap

July 18, 2017

Laboratory equipment is one of the largest cost factors in neuroscience. However, many experiments can be performed with good results using self-assembled setups involving 3-D printed components and self-programmed electronics. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.