Solar power blooms in warren

Solar Power Blooms in Warren

General Motors is introducing a solar charging canopy that moves with the sun. The Tracking Solar Tree is located at GM Company Vehicle Operations.

“We are constantly looking for places where we can add a renewable focus,” said Rob Threlkeld, GM global manager of renewable . “This solar tree is an ideal addition because not only does it provide a space to charge our electric vehicles, but it’s another step in our journey toward cleaner energy use.”

The Tracking Solar Tree, built in America by Envision Solar, features a hybrid multi-axis tracking design which enables the entire canopy to track the , increasing clean renewable energy production by about 25 percent. This structure will produce up to 30,000 kilowatt hours a year and provide enough solar energy to charge six electric vehicles per day.

’ commitment to the environment is clear,” said Desmond Wheatley, president of Envision Solar. “Our tracking Solar Trees are a beautiful and visible embodiment of that commitment. We look forward to deploying many more in the months to come.”


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Source: General Motors
Citation: Solar power blooms in warren (2011, November 18) retrieved 16 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-solar-power-blooms-warren.html
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Nov 18, 2011
Doesn't the average household consume 14,000 kwh a year? But this will charge 6 electric cars in a day?

Nov 18, 2011
Shouldn't 'warren' be capitalized?

Nov 19, 2011
Doesn't seem very efficient.
Compared to what? Heating up the autos and pavement? Relative to that the ratio is infinite.

Nov 19, 2011
Doesn't the average household consume 14,000 kwh a year? But this will charge 6 electric cars in a day?


30,000 kWh is roughly 120,000 miles driven, or 20,000 miles per car per year.

Nov 19, 2011
20,000 miles is on the upper limits of what an electric car can do in a year, because it would run out of charge on longer day trips. You'd need some special circumstances where you travel e.g. 55 miles every day without fail, or 75 miles for 5 days a week plus ten miles on the weekends, because you can't travel much more than 75 miles a day to pull up the average.

In practice, most electric cars would do 15,000 miles or less in a year according to the idea that EVs are used for commuting and most commute less than 40 miles per day. That makes one solar canopy produce enough energy for eight electric vehicles or more.


Nov 21, 2011
It's 6 cars because 6 cars can park under it.

The next 6 over would have their own tree.

Cars look better in the shade too.

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