An X1.4 Solar Flare and a CME

An X1.4 Solar Flare and a CME
This X1.4 class flare was recorded by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on the morning of September 22, 2011.

(PhysOrg.com) -- A large coronal mass ejection (CME) shot off the West (right) side of the sun at 6:24 PM ET on September 21, 2011. The CME is moving away from Earth at about 900 miles per second.

The next morning, an X1.4 class flare erupted from the other side of the sun, peaking at 7:01 AM ET on September 22. The flare came from N15E88, which is just moving into view as the sun rotates. This flare has caused elevated levels on the East (left) side of the sun. Associated with this flare, there was a significant CME, traveling at over 600 miles per second, that began around 7:24 AM ET.

What is a solar flare? What is a ? For answers to these and other space weather questions, please visit the Spaceweather Frequently Asked Questions page.


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Provided by JPL/NASA
Citation: An X1.4 Solar Flare and a CME (2011, September 23) retrieved 13 June 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2011-09-x14-solar-flare-cme.html
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