La Nina returns, bringing more severe weather: US

A woman walks down the street in the rain on September 6, in New York City
A woman walks down the street in the rain on September 6, in New York City. The weather phenomenon known as La Nina is returning for another season, likely bringing more drought, heavy rains and severe weather to some parts of the world, US forecasters said Thursday.

The weather phenomenon known as La Nina is returning for another season, likely bringing more drought, heavy rains and severe weather to some parts of the world, US forecasters said Thursday.

Experts at the (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center upgraded last month's La Nina Watch to a La Nina Advisory, the agency said in a statement.

The back-to-back emergence of the trend -- which causes cooler than in the Pacific Ocean -- is not unheard of and happens about half the time, NOAA said.

"La Nina, which contributed to extreme weather around the globe during the first half of 2011, has re-emerged in the tropical Pacific Ocean and is forecast to gradually strengthen and continue into winter," it said.

The June 2010 to May 2011 La Nina "contributed to record winter snowfall, spring flooding and drought across the United States, as well as other throughout the world, such as heavy rain in Australia and an extremely dry equatorial eastern Africa."

Over 12 million people across the Horn of Africa are reeling from the region's worst drought in decades, which led the United Nations in July to declare the first famine this century.

The was blamed for extremely heavy downpours in Australia, Southeast Asia and South America over late 2010 and early 2011.

"This means drought is likely to continue in the drought-stricken states of Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico," said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the Climate Prediction Center.

The northwestern United States can brace for a colder winter than usual while southern US states should see a warming trend, he said.


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Sep 08, 2011
Thanks for the story.

There is little doubt: La Nina changes Earth's weather.

There is increasing doubt that CO2 changes Earth's climate!

But CO2 definitely increased the incomes of unscrupulous politicians and climatologists.

www.physorg.com/n...ate.html

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo

Sep 08, 2011
There is increasing doubt that CO2 changes Earth's climate!

But CO2 definitely increased the incomes of unscrupulous politicians and climatologists.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo


So are you revealing your own motivations, after all you are among other things a climatologist.

Recently we've seen on the part of tea party types like yourself that the main motivation for their mistrust and doubt is the fact that they are guilty of the accusations they hurl at others IE maybe you have profited off of doubting human influenced global climate change, but that does not mean ethical scientists who disagree with you share your motivations.

Finally, if it were all about making money, there are about a dozen quick and easy ways to make far more money than pushing a grand, all-encompassing POV like climate change.

Like claiming to be able to make rain would make any climatologist rich overnight even if he were lying.

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