New holographic radar system can track high speed shells

September 23, 2011 by Bob Yirka report
New holographic radar system can track high speed shells

(PhysOrg.com) -- The British firm Cambridge Consultants has announced the successful test of its new 3D holographic radar system that can track fired shells traveling up to 1000 miles per hour. The new system called the Land and Surface Target Scorer (LSTS) and developed for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), is expected to help lower the cost of training and hopefully defend against small high speed enemies.

One of the costs associated with training is in the constant replacement of targets. To get around this problem, the DoD sent out a request for development of a system that would allow for shooting at “off-sets” - positions that are close enough to the to measure hits versus misses, without damaging the actual target. To achieve good results in such a system, a trainee would need to see not just where the shells he’s firing are landing, but the trajectory they take in getting there. Such information helps in plotting where to send the next rounds so as to move ever closer to the intended target, improving accuracy in the process.

To address the problem, engineers from Cambridge Consultants designed an entirely new kind of radar; one that uses 3D technology to create a realistic holographic image in real time that shows the trajectory of rounds fired as well as where they burst in the air or when they hit a target; all of this in a 360° image.

The biggest hurdle the team faced was in differentiating the shell it was tracking from surrounding “noise.” In real world environments, everything from moving water to other projectiles to debris fragments can produce radar hits making it difficult to discern what is what. The new system had to have a way of clearing all the other stuff away to allow the person manning the gun to see very clearly where his round was going. And that’s just what the recent demo of the system showed, an ability to track 5 inch being fired at a rate of one every three seconds.

In addition to saving money on targets, such a system should also lower the cost of ammunition as it appears such a system would reduce training time. The DoD is also hoping to employ the new technology to help in tracking small fast moving targets, such as terrorists in a rubber dingy out to blow up portions of a ship as was done with the USS Cole in 2000.

Explore further: GPS-Based Fuze Expected To Triple Cannon's Accuracy

More information: www.cambridgeconsultants.com/news_pr304.html

Related Stories

GPS-Based Fuze Expected To Triple Cannon's Accuracy

June 27, 2005

United Defense Industries demonstrated a cost-effective system to improve cannon artillery accuracy with the successful firing of inert M795 155-mm cannon projectiles equipped with a two-directional Course Correcting Fuze ...

Airmen Train On Latest Technology

January 26, 2006

A shadowy silhouette is seen through dust clouds, brush and trees. There's neither enough sun nor moonlight to distinguish the surroundings. The atmosphere is unfamiliar, uncomfortable, dangerous and unpredictable. You know ...

Laser shoots down drones at sea (w/ Video)

July 21, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- An infrared laser developed by Arizona company Raytheon Missile Systems has been demonstrated shooting down incoming drones over the ocean off the coast of California.

Raytheon Focuses Radar Expertise on Ground Targets in Motion

July 24, 2005

Seeking more protection for ground forces without enhancing risk to aviators, the U.S. Air Force has engaged Raytheon Company to devise a way for aircraft, from a safe distance, to detect, track and target hostile forces ...

Training eye movement may reduce driver distraction

June 8, 2010

More than 16 people are killed and more than 1,300 people are injured each day in crashes involving a distracted driver, a phenomenon that could be reduced with the right application of motion information and appropriate ...

GPS not working? A shoe radar may help you find your way

December 1, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- The prevalence of global positioning system (GPS) devices in everything from cars to cell phones has almost made getting lost a thing of the past. But what do you do when your GPS isn’t working? Researchers ...

Recommended for you

Enhancing solar power with diatoms

October 20, 2017

Diatoms, a kind of algae that reproduces prodigiously, have been called "the jewels of the sea" for their ability to manipulate light. Now, researchers hope to harness that property to boost solar technology.

4 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Nik_2213
not rated yet Sep 23, 2011
Could this be deployed on land to nail snipers and mortar teams ?
Sonhouse
3 / 5 (2) Sep 23, 2011
Not at the frequency they use. They said they could track 5 inch shells which means the frequency was under 10 gigahertz. If they want to track say a 50 cal machine gun or sniper bullet, the frequency would have to be several times higher, say 30 or 40 gigahertz to give them enough resolution. It's possible however.
Isaacsname
not rated yet Sep 23, 2011
Could this be deployed on land to nail snipers and mortar teams ?


Already done, check out the tv show " superweapons ". As much as I dislike tv, my roomie has one, I saw the exact thing you are asking about. Which likely means that special ops teams, seals etc, have had it for years .
OmegaMolecule
5 / 5 (1) Sep 23, 2011
"up to 1000 miles per hour" Double that and it would be more useful.A bullet traveling at 3000 Fps. is going just over 2000 MPH.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.