Record companies plan music downloading appeal

August 22, 2011

(AP) -- Recording industry attorneys are appealing a recent ruling that reduced the amount of money a Minnesota woman must pay for willfully violating the copyrights of 24 songs.

U.S. District Judge Michael Davis ruled last month that the $1.5 million penalty imposed by a jury was unreasonable, and that Jammie Thomas-Rasset of Brainerd should instead pay $54,000.

The judge also ruled that making copyrighted works available on file-sharing networks does not constitute distribution - a decision that could prevent from telling Thomas-Rasset to stop sharing songs in the future.

Attorneys for the recording industry filed documents Monday indicating they'll appeal both points.

The sued Thomas-Rasset in 2006 for illegally on the file-sharing site Kazaa. The case has seen multiple appeals.

Explore further: Judge cuts $2M penalty in MN song-sharing case

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6 comments

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jonnyboy
5 / 5 (2) Aug 22, 2011
about time
racchole
4.3 / 5 (3) Aug 22, 2011
Chalk up another misstep for the recording industry. Five years of legislation for a $50,000 fine should result in at least a few people losing their jobs at the RIAA.
Jeddy_Mctedder
4 / 5 (4) Aug 22, 2011
they are appealing this? is it not ok for her to pay a multiple for the music?
this is just a punitive fine , the government is in the business of punishing people for thefts of less than 24$.

this is retarded.
Graeme
3.8 / 5 (5) Aug 22, 2011
The government should make clear legislation on the circumstances of music sharing and set penalties, and not let courts and lawyers come up with ridiculous penalties.
Jeddy_Mctedder
3 / 5 (2) Aug 22, 2011
they want to permanently bankrupt somone for a theft of less than 24 dollars.
this is just insane.
Pattern_chaser
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 23, 2011
Record companies are no longer needed or wanted. If we download direct from the artists, we can pay an awful lot less, and they will still receive more. Record companies have never cared about music or artists, only their own profits. Now they're reaping what they sowed. I shan't miss them.

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