Now you can eat -- Angry Birds mooncakes

August 14, 2011
An employee displays the newly launched 'Angry Birds' mooncakes, a popular Chinese baked pastry made from lotus seed paste and salted egg yolks available this time of the year, during the Hong Kong Food Expo on August 14. The pastries are named after the popular mobile game.

Now not only are Angry Birds available on your mobile phone, they can also be found on your dining plate -- in the form of the Angry Birds mooncake, unveiled in Hong Kong on Sunday.

The popular mobile , which was first launched for Apple's mobile operating system in 2009, features cartoonish, wingless birds that the player must slingshot into enemy pig territory to reclaim stolen eggs.

Its huge popularity has prompted a restaurant chain in Hong Kong to strike a deal with its creator and turn the bird into mooncakes -- a pastry eaten to mark the Chinese mid-autumn festival, which falls on September 12 this year.

"The game is a world phenomenon now, it is well-liked by people from three-year-olds to 80-year-olds," said Stephanie Chan, marketing manager of Maxim's Group, which released the bird-shaped mooncakes.

The mooncakes come in two flavours, chocolate, and mango and pomelo, and sell at HK$38 ($4.90) per pair, making their debut at the Hong Kong Food Expo on Sunday where they were immediately snapped up by fans.

Bags containing newly released 'Angry Birds' mooncakes are seen at the Hong Kong Food Expo on August 14. The pastries are named after the popular Angry Birds mobile game and feature cartoonish, wingless birds.

"I come here to buy the mooncakes because I like playing the game," said an excited Kiki Au, a seven-year-old primary school student.

Angry Birds' popularity has led to versions of the game being released for all major smartphone brands, personal computers, and . It currently has at least 120 million active users on mobile devices.

Its creator, Finland-based software developer Rovio Mobile, launched merchandise sales of its own last year, including Angry Birds soft toys, and said in January that it is developing a cartoon series based on the game.

China's mooncake tradition is said to have started after the people were rallied to revolt against the country's Mongolian Yuan dynasty rulers by pieces of paper calling for an uprising on the mid-autumn festival inserted in each cake.

Explore further: Angry Birds developer sets sights on animated series

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Cave_Man
5 / 5 (2) Aug 14, 2011
Wow, it's like if news were made for iDiots! What an idea!

On second thought whoever eats one of these will probably be uncontrollably stealing US secrets and sending them to china, don't eat the happy cakes people for the love of god!
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Aug 15, 2011
OK: Having an article on a video game is already borderline territory for a science site.

BUT: Having an article on mooncakes based on a video game is so far over the 'off topic'-horizon (and accelerating) ...

What the heck were physorg journalists (and editors) thinking when they put this up?
_nigmatic10
not rated yet Aug 15, 2011

BUT: Having an article on mooncakes based on a video game is so far over the 'off topic'-horizon (and accelerating) ...

What the heck were physorg journalists (and editors) thinking when they put this up?


They ate the cakes....

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