Robots Playing Shuffleboard (w/ video)

Robots Playing Shuffleboard (w/ video)
Diagram of shuffleboard layout

(PhysOrg.com) -- Intense robot battles have, for the most part, been confined to the silver screen. Occasionally a robot comes by to trounce us at chess, but robot on robot competition has been fairly limited. In this case however the combat was not an epic fight to the death, it was a game of shuffleboard.

A team of 36 students from departments the electrical engineering, , and computer science students at Oregon State University create a group of shuffleboard playing robots. The robots gave a brief demonstration of their skills in the atrium of the schools Kelley Engineering Center.

The demonstration was in the form of a tournament. The students, in smaller interdisciplinary groups of three or four, each made a bot that was capable of sensing the puck and moving it as close as possible to the scoring zone in the center of the table as possible. The robots scores ranged from one to four, depending on how close they managed to get the puck to the target.

The game was chosen because it requires only simple movements and it is easy to see how successful the robot has been at achieving the goal, since it has a limited number of interfering factors. Unlike a game like basketball, where the robots would have to account not only for each others movements, but on a ball that can bounce away without warning.

Student teams spent more than 200 hours on their players, which were part of a project for an interdisciplinary robotics course that was offered by the university.

Shuffleboard Robot (reloading view)
Shuffleboard Robot

Explore further

Robots play soccer, make breakfast at the RoboCup German Open 2011 (w/ video)

More information: classes.engr.oregonstate.edu/e … group/gp8/index.html

via

© 2010 PhysOrg.com

Citation: Robots Playing Shuffleboard (w/ video) (2011, June 8) retrieved 18 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-06-robots-shuffleboard-video.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Jun 08, 2011
Now future robots will have an enjoyable activity after they retire. ;)

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more