Toshiba to launch no-glasses 3D monitors

(PhysOrg.com) -- Rumors are flying out of Taiwan. Those rumors claim that Toshiba is working on a line of 3D laptops that do not require the users to have 3D glasses on their face. The concept of no-glasses 3D is something that is already a very real possibility. After all, Nintendo recently released a 3D video game console with this exact feature, the Nintendo 3DS, which launched on March 27th of this year.

The 3D images will be created by projecting multiple rays of light that come at the viewer from different angles, creating nine different degrees of images. These rumors may have some foundation in fact. When you consider that launched a line of 3D HDTVs in late 2010, after showing off a 21 inch prototype at the April 2010 CEDEC. The sample shown off at CEDEC was based of off a lenticular lens sheet mounted onto a high-definition LCD panel. So, you can see how switching over to 3D monitors would not be a large leap at all.

Currently several different makers, such as Acer, Asustek, HP, Dell, Lonovo have launched 3D laptops that currently use different types of technology and glasses.

No one is exactly sure how popular 3D technology will become in the future. While it is cool, 3D technology to date have shown that there can be some real drawbacks to the technology. Users who spend quality time with their Nintendo 3DS have experienced a range of side effects, from headache to nausea.

If the rumors pan out to be true the laptops will launch in the second half of 2011.


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