The Predator system helps the disabled to use computers (w/ video)

The Predator system helps the disabled to use computers (w/ video)
Zdenek Kalal

(PhysOrg.com) -- If I told you about something called the Predator system, what would come to mind? The first thing that comes to this reporter's mind is The Predator that was made famous in the film of the same name. So, you can how distress is a natural reaction when you hear that someone is developing one right here on earth.

Well, sci-fi style, nightmare scenarios about the end of the world aside, the Predator system is quite real, but instead of being the ultimate killing machine, it is a visually based that might help the disabled to use computers more effectively.

The developer of the Predator system is a student at the University of Surrey Zdenek Kalal, who studies at the university’s Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing. He was given an award, the Technology Everywhere award, for developing the Predator system. The event was hosted by the UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

The Predator system is designed for enhanced tracking and could potentially allow a paralyzed person to use an item, such as a pen placed in a mouth, in order to operate the mouse on a computer. This technique would provide a method of communicating with the world for a traditionally isolated group.

What makes this system unique is the fact that this system has the capability to learn over time, and track a user more effectively. Once and item is designated, and multiple items can be designated, one at a time, the system is able to track the item as it moves about, and even if it leaves the screen and returns.

In addition to helping the disabled the system has the potential to be used in a range of biometric security options.


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Citation: The Predator system helps the disabled to use computers (w/ video) (2011, April 1) retrieved 1 July 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-predator-disabled-video.html
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