Calif. man used Facebook to hack women's e-mails

Calif. man used Facebook to hack women's e-mails (AP)
In this undated photo provided by the California Attorney General's office, George Bronk is shown. Bronk admitted using personal information he gleaned from Facebook to hack into dozens of women's e-mail accounts across the nation and overseas. The California attorney general's office says the 23-year-old would scan the e-mails for nude and seminude photos and videos that he often forwarded to the victim's entire e-mail address book. (AP Photo/California Attorney General's office)
(AP) -- In a cautionary tale for users of social-networking sites, a California man has admitted using personal information he gleaned from Facebook to hack into women's e-mail accounts, then send nude pictures of them to everyone in their address book.

The California attorney general's office said Friday that George Bronk, 23, commandeered the e-mail accounts of dozens of women in the U.S. and England. He then scanned the women's "sent" folders for nude and seminude photos and videos, and forwarded any he found to all the women's contacts, prosecutors said.

Bronk coerced one woman into sending him more explicit photographs by threatening to distribute the pictures he already had. One victim told authorities the intrusion felt like "virtual rape."

Bronk, who lives in the Sacramento suburb of Citrus Heights, pleaded guilty Thursday to seven felonies in Sacramento County Superior Court, including computer intrusion, false impersonation and possession of child pornography.

Prosecutors are seeking a six-year prison term when Bronk returns for a sentencing evaluation March 10.

His attorney, Monica Lynch of Roseville, called her client a "23-year-old boy going on 15."

"He's accepted full responsibility. It's a tragic situation," she said.

Lynch said she will argue for less than a six-year sentence.

Prosecutors said Bronk would scan women's Facebook accounts looking for those who posted their e-mail addresses. He would then study their Facebook postings to learn the answers to common security questions like their favorite color or father's middle name.

He contacted the women's e-mail providers and used the information to gain control of their accounts. He also often gained control of their Facebook accounts by hijacking their passwords, then posted compromising photographs on their Facebook pages and other Internet sites.

"This case highlights the fact that anyone with an e-mail account is vulnerable to identity theft," Attorney General Kamala Harris said in a statement announcing Bronk's guilty plea.

Investigators found 172 e-mail files containing explicit photographs of women when they searched Bronk's computer in September, according to a court affidavit. They were able to track his victims to England, Washington, D.C., and 17 states: Alabama, Arizona, California, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

"He is a sick individual," said 22-year-old Danielle Piscak of Parkland, Wash., one of Bronk's victims.

Piscak said one of her friends alerted her that nude photographs she had sent privately to her husband were posted on her Facebook page last fall. Facebook removed the photos the next day.

"I have a network of like 1,500 people, so they all saw my pictures. So my graduating class of 2007 saw that. I'm in the military, so all my army friends saw that," Piscak said. She had to explain the embarrassing situation to her family and husband, from whom she is separated.

Piscak used a different e-mail account to contact the person who had hacked her page.

"I said, 'Why are you doing this?' and he said, 'Because it's funny,'" Piscak said in a telephone interview. The Associated Press does not identify victims in sex cases as a matter of policy, but Piscak gave permission for her name to be used. She also said she has agreed to tell her story on a nationally televised talk show.

Piscak said she fears the postings could harm her future in the military and her plans for a career in criminal justice, though most people who saw the photos were understanding.

A second victim, Stephanie, 24, of Los Angeles, said she, the FBI and other authorities tried for seven hours to remove an album of 10 photographs that Bronk posted on her account before Facebook took it down.

"Then he wrote just crass, racist, disgusting comments on people's walls that I was friends with," said Stephanie, who did not want her last name used for fear the story could harm her career. She said she felt violated, "kind of a rape-like situation."

Stephanie said she originally had sent the private photos to a boyfriend, only to have them seen by her college professors and co-workers.

Both of the victims, along with Bronk's attorney, said Facebook should have caught Bronk's activities more quickly. spokesmen did not return telephone or e-mail messages Friday.

Bronk began his hacking in December 2009, prosecutors said. He will have to register as a sex offender because of his guilty plea.

Investigators caught on after a victim called Connecticut State Police, which referred the complaint to the California Highway Patrol. They used information from Bronk's confiscated computer to e-mail questionnaires to 3,200 of his Internet contacts, asking if they had been victimized.

Forty-six women said they had. Bronk was arrested in October and remains jailed on $500,000 bond.

The attorney general's office advised those using e-mail and social-networking sites to pick security questions and answers that aren't posted on public sites, or to add numbers or other characters to common security answers. Additional safety tips are on the California attorney general's website.


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Jan 15, 2011
"This case highlights the fact that anyone with an e-mail account is vulnerable to identity theft," Attorney General Kamala Harris
Not anyone. Not someone who configures his own mail server on his own server in his own domain and abhors Facebook and Windows alike.


Security through obscurity is not security, although it can certainly improve your odds. Still, if you ever use the e-mail address to communicate with someone else, you are opening up the possibility of receiving malicious code. Plus all the public IP space is constantly being scanned, so someone could still easily find your mail server and quite possibly exploit it directly to get your details even if you have optimal settings for security. Not likely, granted, but very possible.

Being on the internet at all opens you up to potential ID theft through the internet.

Jan 15, 2011
Yeah, he's a bad person, no doubt. But, don't put the answers to your security questions on Facebook. Don't use passwords that are common, or plays on your name. Don't use the same password for everything. I have a common password I use for most sites. But my email has an entirely different and more secure password so that they can't use the "forgot your password" link and get it from my email. If you are being coerced, call the police, instead of giving him more pictures. A little common sense goes a long way.

Jan 15, 2011
Well, pretty sure no woman out there will ever touch this perv with a ten foot pole.

Assuming that they would touch him before his little stunt?

Despite this being a stupid and immature crime, it's nearly as bad to be posting nude photos of yourself on the web.

Jan 16, 2011
Despite this being a stupid and immature crime, it's nearly as bad to be posting nude photos of yourself on the web.

So a woman is in the wrong for emailing nude photos of herself to her husband? Really?

Jan 16, 2011
Realistically the majority of malware is fire and forget. Internet bukkake so to speak.

If someone wants in your system, and they're dedicated, they'll get in.

Jan 16, 2011
... Internet bukkake so to speak.....



I don't know how to make an emoticon grimace, lol. Good one though. You actually got me to a Wikipedia article on Bukkake to make sure I remembered what it was correctly. Well played.

Jan 16, 2011
So a woman is in the wrong for emailing nude photos of herself to her husband? Really?

Who said it was morally wrong? I said it was stupid. There's a significant difference.

Jan 17, 2011
Who said it was morally wrong? I said it was stupid. There's a significant difference.


Not stupid, either. She was in the Army. I'm going to guess she was geographically displaced from here husband at the time. Ever been away from a spouse or child for several months or more? I'll guess not. The stupid thing she did was not simply communicating love, but poor security.

Jan 18, 2011
Who said it was morally wrong? I said it was stupid. There's a significant difference.


Not stupid, either. She was in the Army. I'm going to guess she was geographically displaced from here husband at the time. Ever been away from a spouse or child for several months or more? I'll guess not. The stupid thing she did was not simply communicating love, but poor security.


Well it's great to know that we have people in the army who lack so much common sense. She should have known not to cooperate. Whenever somebody who's got you by the balls says they'll let go if you keep playing their game, they are lying. She should have reported it to her superiors, or her family in the U.S. so they could contact the police.

Jan 19, 2011
Yeah. I was referring to the initial nudy pic to the hubby, not the response to blackmail.

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