Sample shipments of 30nm process 4-Gigabyte DDR3 SO-DIMM out by Elpida

December 21, 2010

Elpida Memory, Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced it has begun sample shipments of its newly developed 30nm process 4-gigabyte DDR3 SO-DIMM. The new memory module was built using currently available advanced 30nm process DRAM manufacturing technology and is composed of sixteen 2-gigabit DDR3 SDRAMs. It achieves a high density of 4 gigabytes.

Compared with Elpida's 40nm module, the new product uses 20% less operating current and 30% less standby current consumed by PC systems, and as a DRAM module it achieves one of the lowest levels of current consumption in the industry. The new eco-friendly DRAM product provide an effective power-saving response to today's need for a longer for notebook PCs, netbooks, tablet PCs and other handheld .

Also, the new module offers a data transfer rate of up to 1866 Megabits per second (Mbps). It can support the high performance and high functionality of computer devices that have to manage steadily increasing data volumes.

As Elpida is making a shift from 40nm to 30nm manufacturing, limiting the change in the manufacturing process can help reduce the need for new investment and lower cost. The new module uses 30nm advanced process technology to not only improve performance but to also achieve a much higher level of cost competitiveness.

Elpida plans to begin mass manufacture of the 4-gigabyte DDR3 SO-DIMM in the first quarter of CY 2011.

Explore further: Elpida develops industry's smallest 30nm process 2-Gigabit DDR3 SDRAM

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Quantum_Conundrum
not rated yet Dec 21, 2010
Compared with Elpida's 40nm DRAM module, the new product uses 20% less operating current and 30% less standby current consumed by PC systems


That's incredible.

Too bad neither electric, nor hybrid, nor gasoline, nor deisel automobiles ever make that sort of gain in efficiency.

If this happened in an internal combustion engine design, we'd instantly get 42 to 50mpg in non-hybrid, mainstream make/model autos.

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