Dutch police arrest second teenager for hacking

US President Barack Obama said the cable releases by WikiLeaks should not harm bilateral ties
The homepage of Wikileaks.ch with a picture of its founder Julian Assange is seen on a computer screen on December 4. Dutch police arrested a 19-year-old on suspicion of hacking a government website, the second teenage arrest for cyber attacks linked to the WikiLeaks fallout, prosecutors said on Saturday.

Dutch police arrested a 19-year-old on suspicion of hacking a government website, the second teenage arrest for cyber attacks linked to the WikiLeaks fallout, prosecutors said on Saturday.

Police arrested the man on Saturday afternoon in the municipality of Hoogezand-Sappemeer, suspecting him of being one of the people responsible for an attack on the website of the national prosecutor.

An anonymous group claimed responsibility for the attack on microblogging site Twitter, saying it was to avenge the arrest of a 16-year-old who had attacked opponents of whistleblower website WikiLeaks, the prosecutor said in a statement.

The 19-year-old suspected had incited others to take part in Friday's attack, the prosecutor said.

Under Dutch law the maxiumum penalty for a -- in which a target computer or website is rendered unusable -- is six years in prison, the prosecutor said.

Hackers -- dubbed "hack-tivists" -- stepped up cyber attacks on those they perceived as opponents of WikiLeaks, including companies who in recent days have deprived the organisation of their services.


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Dutch police investigate apparent hacker attack

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Citation: Dutch police arrest second teenager for hacking (2010, December 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-12-dutch-police-teenager-hacking.html
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Dec 11, 2010
Attacking targets inside your own country can be a foolish thing to do. A hacktivist would want as many layers as possible protecting their identity, and the increased difficulty of international investigation and prosecution would work in their favor. The article makes no mention of this guy covering his tracks in any way at all, but who knows.

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