Simulating black hole radiation with lasers

Simulating black hole radiation with lasers
This experimental layout produces a detectable analogue of Hawking radiation. The input laser pulse is focused into a sample of fused silica (FS) using an axicon or lens (F). An imaging lens (I) collects the photons emitted at 90 deg and sends them to an imaging spectrometer coupled to a cooled CCD camera. Credit: F. Belgiorno, S.L. Cacciatori, M. Clerici, V. Gorini, G. Ortenzi, L. Rizzi, E. Rubino, V.G. Sala, D. Faccio

Hawking radiation from black holes is very dim, and unlikely to be detected any time soon. Now researchers have created a laboratory experiment that produces detectable Hawking radiation with a laser.

A team of Italian scientists has fired a beam into a hunk of glass to create what they believe is an optical analogue of the that many physicists expect is emitted by . Although the laser experiment superficially bears little resemblance to ultra-dense black holes, the mathematical theories used to describe both are similar enough that confirmation of laser-induced Hawking radiation would bolster confidence that black holes also emit Hawking radiation.

When Stephen Hawking first predicted the radiation bearing his name in 1974, he hypothesized that photons could be spontaneously generated from the vacuum at the edge of a black hole. However, Hawking radiation emitted from a black hole would be so weak that many scientists believe it to be nearly impossible to detect.

Scientists have turned to lasers before in attempts to create Hawking radiation, but have had difficulty isolating Hawking radiation from other forms of light emitted during experiments. Franco Belgiorno et al. combined a tunable laser beam with a bulk glass target, which allowed them to limit the Hawking radiation to certain wavelengths of and to capture the apparent Hawking radiation with an infrared sensitive digital camera.

A paper describing the possible production of a laser induced analogue of Hawking radiation appears in the current issue of , and is the subject of a Viewpoint article by John Dudley (CNRS, France) and Dmitry Skryabin (University of Bath, UK) in this week's edition of Physics.


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Physicists may have observed Hawking radiation for the first time

More information: Hawking Radiation from Ultrashort Laser Pulse Filaments, link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.203901
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Citation: Simulating black hole radiation with lasers (2010, November 8) retrieved 17 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-simulating-black-hole-lasers.html
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Nov 09, 2010
There is a special type of detectable radiation that black holes give out that we dont look for...

its similar to hawking radiation. we just haven't taken the time to really think about certain conditions and strange attractors...

IE... there is ANOTHER source of exiting energy...

[it doesn't matter if i figured it out. after a lifetime of figuring lots of stuff out before others do, its only use is to see and wait till they figure it out. every and any attempt to share it in any meaningful way never works out... however they do write and send me papers once it happens remarking how 'lucky' i am]

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